Snake questions

marshman

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Jul 10, 2017
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263
Location
Southwest Washington
I will be hunting mid to south central Idaho this fall for Mulies, I plan to go on a scouting trip to the areas I am looking at in about two weeks, the elevation ranges from 6,000 to 8,500 feet. Will i encounter rattlesnakes at this elevation? I have read some that this would be too high an elevation to encounter many rattlesnakes. Being from the coast I don't contend with this issue, and even on my out of state hunts in the past never give it much thought hunting in the fall. But this scouting trip in August is going to include hiking and my wife so I am trying to get an idea. Being close to a rattlesnake would freak her out for sure, I don't really want her that spooked for a week:)
 

rtraverdavis

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Oct 20, 2016
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1,235
Location
OREGON
It’s possible, but I certainly wouldn’t sweat it. Rockpiles and sunny streambanks in the evening would be the most likely spots to run into them.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2016
Messages
54
Location
Lost River, Idaho
Rattlesnakes can and will be in the region, and could be out as late as October. However I expect an encounter to be of low percentage.

Often once over 6000' I tend to see a lot less.

- J
 

ElkFever2

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Mar 4, 2019
Messages
1,214
Location
Iowa
They're not hard to avoid. Listen for the rattle, watch where you step, and proceed slowly on sun-exposed rocks. I've walked up on maybe 12 of them and none too close for comfort.
 

RockinU

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Jan 27, 2019
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573
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Texas
They don't want any more to do with you than you do with them. Just pay attention and you'll be fine.
 

kmott

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Jan 16, 2010
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Location
idaho
it is certainly possible but as said above ,I wouldn't sweat it much
 

dirtclod Az.

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Jan 24, 2018
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Rattlesnakes tend to hang around water,walk slow and watch where you step.
Good eatin'! 😎
 

Gellar

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Jan 31, 2014
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The Driftless Area
I help train our local ems on how to handle venomous snakebites in our area. We have 1-2 annually where I live. It doesn't hurt to be prepared and know what to do. According to the AZ Poison control who is the leading authority on snake bites, there are around 7000 venomous bites on humans annually. About 80% of bites are to the hand area and 13% to the lower leg. 55% of snakebite victims are between the age 17-27 years old and nearly 1/3 of all snakebite victims are intoxicated. About 50% of victims report trying to handle or catch the snake causing the bite. Wearing denim jeans can lower the amount of venom injected by nearly 1/2.

The Florida Snakebite Institute recommends this pre-hospital care when bitten by a snake:
1. Immediately remove victim from vicinity of the offending snake to safe location.
2. Attempt to identify the species. DO NOT attempt to capture the snake (which may lead to additional bites). Attempt to photograph the snake for identification (if possible, from different angles to ensure appropriate identification).
3. Attempt to keep victim calm (increased heart rate speeds absorption of venom).
4. Keep the victim flat with head slightly elevated. In the event of vomiting, turn patient on side to prevent aspiration of vomit.
5. DO NOT give the victim anything to eat or drink (envenomation may cause nausea and vomiting)
6. Remove any tight fitting or constrictive clothing or jewelry in anticipation of progressive swelling.
7. Wash the bite site with water to remove any topical deposits of venom on the surface. DO NOT rub or massage the bite site.

8. Mark the fang punctures and the leading edge of the swelling with a pen, and time the mark.
9. Copperhead and cottonmouth bites should be elevated to/or above the level of the heart. Splint the extremity at or below the level of the heart for rattlesnake bites due to the potential for systemic symptoms until IV access can be obtained by EMS or ER personnel.
10. Transport the victim immediately to a hospital capable of treating a snakebite. If possible, call ahead to the treating hospital to notify of the incoming snakebite victim, species of snake if known and estimated time of arrival to facility. If possible, have antivenom transported to hospital ahead of patient to have ready for victim upon arrival. Ensure Poison Control is notified of the bite to ensure expert consultation.
11. Record any symptoms and the time of occurrence.
12. DO NOT apply a tourniquet unless transport will be delayed more than 2 hours (Life over limb). If a tourniquet has been applied, it should not be removed until at the treating facility and receiving antivenom. DO NOT apply ice to the bite (which may increase tissue damage). DO NOT incise (cut) and suck venom from the bite site (Shown to cause more harm than good, and ineffective in removing venom). DO NOT apply commercial suction devices (Shown to be ineffective in removing venom).
13. In the event of Cardiac arrest, begin CPR immediately. In the event of respiratory arrest, provide rescue breathing.
Most hospitals do not handle snakebites regularly so demand that the doctor contacts poison control for best course of action.

The red is most important, I personally would disregard trying to photograph or identify the snake as all venomous snakes in that area are pit vipers and they receive the same antivenom treatment (cro-fab)
 

JLS

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Mar 26, 2012
Messages
7,532
Location
Somewhere in the basalt rocks
to the areas I am looking at in about two weeks, the elevation ranges from 6,000 to 8,500 feet. Will i encounter rattlesnakes at this elevation? I have read some that this would be too high an elevation to encounter many rattlesnakes.
You might. It’s entirely possible, but not overly probable.
 

antelopedundee

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Jul 12, 2018
Messages
987
Location
Ames
Duluth Trading Firehose work pants will repel most if not all snake strikes. Only ever seen one in all of my trips west and it was the first hunting trip there.
 

LopeHunter

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May 31, 2007
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2,429
Location
MO-->CA-->NW-->AZ&NW
Reminds me of the punchline to an old joke where the two guys are deep in the wilderness when one gets bitten as is urinating so his buddy uses the satellite phone to call 9-1-1:

"Jimmy, what is 9-1-1 saying to you about my bite?"

"Darrell, they say you is going to die!"
 

Gila

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Jun 8, 2019
Messages
274
Location
New Mexico
Idaho probably isn't too bad. Here in New Mexico when it is warm, the probability that you could step on a rattler is quite high. The Western Diamondbacks are the worst killers. Although there are about 8 different species here. We live a mile high in the desert near the foothills. We have had two dogs bitten but both survived with antivenin. Our JR pup's grandsire was bitten by a diamondback last week but did not survive. I stepped on a Hopi that was stretched out across the diveway last year. I wasn't wearing boots--close call. I always go out the door to do chores wearing my justin snake boots. The justin boots are really good for working in but are heavy. For scouting and warm weather hunting I wear Irish Setter Vaprtrek snake boots. They are lace up, knee high, waterproof and very lightweight. They give good ankle support when climbing and keep the cactus, brambles, rocks, off of your legs. I Think they might still make a zip up model for women but not sure. They last a long time.

When camping stay away from rock piles and fallen timber. Peak times for snakes encounters are early morning and early evening. Approach water in an open area. Look underneath and behind whatever you sit on. Some species will climb small bushes and lower limbs. Grab your sleeping bag by the straps slowly pick it up then shake it from the bottom. Check your tent well and zip up the doors. If one is found in the tent don't pick up a corner because they can bite through it. If you encounter one just leave it alone and move away from it. I have watched tv shows where the hunter has said the rancher would want them to kill the snake. In reality most ranchers would rather deal with the snake themselves then haul somebody out with snake bite. Not trying to discourage anyone here, just that we enter the snakes domain. You may go back there time again for many years and never ever see a snake, which I hope is the case. Just have fun only be be aware and stay safe.
 

Gila

Active member
Joined
Jun 8, 2019
Messages
274
Location
New Mexico
Reminds me of the punchline to an old joke where the two guys are deep in the wilderness when one gets bitten as is urinating so his buddy uses the satellite phone to call 9-1-1:

"Jimmy, what is 9-1-1 saying to you about my bite?"

"Darrell, they say you is going to die!"
City Slickers 2 is my favorite.
 

marshman

Active member
Joined
Jul 10, 2017
Messages
263
Location
Southwest Washington
Idaho probably isn't too bad. Here in New Mexico when it is warm, the probability that you could step on a rattler is quite high. The Western Diamondbacks are the worst killers. Although there are about 8 different species here. We live a mile high in the desert near the foothills. We have had two dogs bitten but both survived with antivenin. Our JR pup's grandsire was bitten by a diamondback last week but did not survive. I stepped on a Hopi that was stretched out across the diveway last year. I wasn't wearing boots--close call. I always go out the door to do chores wearing my justin snake boots. The justin boots are really good for working in but are heavy. For scouting and warm weather hunting I wear Irish Setter Vaprtrek snake boots. They are lace up, knee high, waterproof and very lightweight. They give good ankle support when climbing and keep the cactus, brambles, rocks, off of your legs. I Think they might still make a zip up model for women but not sure. They last a long time.

When camping stay away from rock piles and fallen timber. Peak times for snakes encounters are early morning and early evening. Approach water in an open area. Look underneath and behind whatever you sit on. Some species will climb small bushes and lower limbs. Grab your sleeping bag by the straps slowly pick it up then shake it from the bottom. Check your tent well and zip up the doors. If one is found in the tent don't pick up a corner because they can bite through it. If you encounter one just leave it alone and move away from it. I have watched tv shows where the hunter has said the rancher would want them to kill the snake. In reality most ranchers would rather deal with the snake themselves then haul somebody out with snake bite. Not trying to discourage anyone here, just that we enter the snakes domain. You may go back there time again for many years and never ever see a snake, which I hope is the case. Just have fun only be be aware and stay safe.
Crap we don't even have black widows or tick's here let alone rattlers
 

hank4elk

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Joined
Jan 8, 2015
Messages
3,512
Location
SW NM
We don't have ticks, fleas or mosquitos on the place. Plenty of snakes though.
We also have Mojave Greens,not many but deadly & Pinion Gnats(my particular nemisis now)....lol


Good to see some Currant Protacols shown too.
I have personally had more trouble when I was EMT with SBV after folks cut & suck & screw up ...slap a poultice on er,you'll be good....lol
 
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