Question for the Advanced Bowhunters

B

bcat

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I have a question. This is just my second year bowhunting for myself. I have a Martin Lynx bow set up with Fiberoptic stationary pins. I have never practiced shooting up or down hills. I am going sheep hunting for a week or ten days with the bow, and wondered what you pro's out there would do. Should I practice shooting uphill and downhill, or does that kind of shooting make the arrow do anything different than it would shooting on the flat ground? When shooting uphill should I compensate a little higher, and downhill a little lower or what? Or should I just practice on a hillside? bcat
 

rthrbhntng

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Dec 29, 2000
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Phoenix, AZ.
Bcat,
You really need to practice the uphill and downhill because each person uses different parts of their body to aim high or low. The correct method is to draw on the level then bend at the waist.
Keep in mind that the angle of the shot dictates how much less yardage you are shooting. If the actual level yardage is 30 yards straight line then at a 45 degree uphill angle you would use your 30 yard pin even though the range finder says 37 yards. If you range the distance up or down then you would shoot it for less yardage. A good example is that if you are on a hill looking down and a 200" ram is at the base of a tree and you range it at 40 yards to the ram then you need to range to the top of the tree or any spot on the tree that is level with your position. You will find that the distance of the arrow travel that is effected by gravity is much less and that is the distance to shoot for.
This is just as important in rifle but not till you are shooting long distances.
The other thing that is hard for most archers to remember is the aiming point on the animal has changed and you need to think in terms of the center of the kill zone and where you need to hit to get the arrow to go through the center. This would mean you need to aim a little low on the uphill shots and a little high on the downhill shots. The yardage or pin doesn't change just the aiming point of your sight.
Good luck!
Steve
 
B

bcat

Guest
Thank you Steve and I will practise on the uphill and downhill shots. It seems backwards to me to aim high on the down hill and low on the uphill tho...... I will have to just practice at it until I am confident what it is doing. Thanks for the advise. ANy other tips, I am very inexperianced still and have Much to learn about the mechanics of the whole thing. bcat
 

Thumper

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Dec 15, 2000
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Aksai, Kazakhstan via Covington Louisiana
Cuz, I can not say a bunch, but considering the situation I would start practicing up hill shots first as you willl probably be shooting that direction. I would say for 30 yards, take 12 steps, but with you long legs that would be about 200 yards!:D

Second is the funny one, on top of the roof shooting down! Just make sure not to fall off.
For me an up hill shot is harder to master as the distance is harder to judge and if you aim too high, you can bet on an overshot! Why? because the distance is normally less than you figure.
Hope some of the Bow Pro's will come out the wood work with more advise. All I can say is practice with the up and down shots.
 

1_pointer

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Dec 20, 2000
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Indiana
Bcat- The only advice that I can give is to just shoot and get used to it. I only use one pin at 20 yards and the rest is instinctive. But good luck. Bowhunting take much more practice shooting than rifle hunting, IMHO, so practice and get that ram.
 
B

bcat

Guest
Steve -Did you get that elk licence from that guy or does he still have it? If you didnt do you still have the number. I may have someone that wants it. Thumper, I have that big hill behind the house to practice on. It is a steep hill. I need to get a dozen practice arrows, next time I get to the big ****ty.....:D:D bcat

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ 18 June 2001 07:04: Message edited by: bcat ]</font>
 

DKO

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Dec 11, 2000
Messages
696
rthrbhntg, nailed the mechanics of uphill and downhill shooting, very well i might add!it just a matter of shooting alot and like judging distance the elevation thing will come with practice! Doug , are you planning on spotting and stalking them, a buddy of mine who had numerous rams to his credits told me practice more downhill shots because chances of stalikng within archery range from a downhill position is very difficult, not impossible but difficult!!! GOOD LUCK!!!
 

rthrbhntng

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Joined
Dec 29, 2000
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Phoenix, AZ.
I too second the downhill practice. Most of the guys I know that got their sheep came up over a ridge from above and shot downhill. Bcat I might have the # at the office and no I didn't get it he had a standing offer of $6000 and was looking for more. I had a friend call from Denver and that is what he told me.
Practice, practice, practice.
Good luck.
Steve
 
B

bcat

Guest
Thanks Dko and Steve. I had kinda figured that most shots would be down hill and not to many uphil chances becasue they see so well an usualy stay as high up as they can to look for predators. I will practice alot between now and then for sure. SH1t that guy was really wanting to sell that licence for some bucks wasnt he? Cant blame him I guess. Well thats the way it goes Steve. Maybe next year. bcat
 

REDBEARD

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Feb 19, 2001
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the high country, PA
bcat,

after shooting the bow for some 25 odd years, and i do mean odd!....take the time and practice as many different scenarios as you possibly can......tell yerself before every shot you take," this is it, this is the book ram ive been waiting for"....this will also help build tension....and make the stakes go high.....what ever ye do, be comfortable with your equipment....ie..draw weight, pin setup, anchor points, grip, release aid or finger setup, rest, arrow clearance, fletching/vane setup, arrow spine/size, make sure your equipment is right and works perfect!...if you have any questions about your setup feel free to email me.....PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!...but most of all, MAKE EVERY ARROW COUNT....dont just go out back and fling a few dozen so so arrows, one perfect arrow a day at your optimum yardage, is better than 500 so so shots...good luck

REDBEARD
 
B

bcat

Guest
Thats some real good advise Jason. I just got some bales moved to the house so I can set up my everlasting target. I will do some shooting downhill and uphill just so I know how it all works. I am very confident now to about thirty yards, but thats it. Thanks for the info and I will be in touch. I am having trouble keeping the cerving from unwuinding all the time. I guess its time for a new string too. bcat
 

1_pointer

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Dec 20, 2000
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bcat-

Another way to increase you shooting ability fast, and I mean real fast, is to practice with a good friend that's a better shot than you. I know it's just 'practice', but when his groups are tighter the competitive juices kick and you will concentrate more. Plus, you have someone quite handy to rib you when you make a bad shot!!!
 

REDBEARD

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Joined
Feb 19, 2001
Messages
33
Location
the high country, PA
bcat,

when i come out this year, i know it will be after your sheep hunt...I'll tie you a center serving that wont unwind!...til then....if it is unwinding where your release sets on the string, take dental floss, and wrap that over the serving to build it up some, this will need replaced every few hundred shots or so, also, tie wrap and tie some dental floss above your knock point...this will keep it from sliding...I'll try and take a picture of my set up and send it out next week...replace your string and cables now, shoot them a few hundred times, then get another set put on and shoot them in, stuff the other set in yer back pack and get a handy dandy field bow press, nothing like climbing your way to sheep country and see a frayed cable or string.......and dont OVERBOW yerself, I dont care HOW tuff you are...55lbs will be plenty for sheep, especially if yer arrows are flying like a beam of light!, plus with all that dental floss on the string you'll be able to have nice teeth out in the bush!...LOL!

if ye really want to get good......get real close to yer target...like 5 feet away...draw yer bow....act like yer going to shoot with aiming and every thing, then CLOSE YER EYES...and shoot....repeat over and over....until you feel the shot...you'll see what i mean.....

REDBEARD's Archery Consulting!
 
B

bcat

Guest
Thanks for the advise guys. I have another question. Target arrows/Broadheads....... I am getting very proficient hitting the target with the target arrows. I dont have the right kindof target to practice with the broadheads. How much diference will there be how the arrow flies. I was all practiced up last year, and took two or three shots at deer, and shot underneath them each time. Either I was not following thru, pullong down as I shot or I wondered if the braodheads made the arrow shoot lower????? bcat
 

REDBEARD

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Joined
Feb 19, 2001
Messages
33
Location
the high country, PA
bcat,

sounds as if the arrows are "planing" with your broadheads on....again, the best advice is to buy a good broadhead(2) packs and use one pack or a couple of heads to sight your bow in with.....also all fixed blade broadheads should be shot on arrows that are fletched with a helicle or offset....in other words, the fletching or vane should have a slight, moderate or extreme twist to them to get the arrow spinning in flight....also fletching seems to to work better than plastic vanes, although they are tougher to keep in good shape while in the field....most of todays modern compounds are quite easy to tune, it just seems harder and harder to find a competent "pro" shop nowadays.....whatever you do...

1. make sure your arrows are flying true, even with the field points

2. make sure your equipment matches, ie, arrow FOC, Spine, length, knocking height according to shooting style(fingers or release?), rest centering, limb tiller.

3. field point weight = broadhead weight

4. DONT BUY MECHANICAL BROADHEADS. You may be sorry.

it would be helpful if you posted some of your equipment then we could help u thru this stuff.....

REDBEARD
 
B

bcat

Guest
I am shooting a Martin Lynx bow, with Easton 2317 XX75 arrows with plastic . 125 grain broadheads, NOT MECHANICAL....DOnt remeber the length of the arrows. I can hit the target just fine with my target arrows but havent been to the big city to by extra broadheads to shoot with. I have one of those targets with the stuffing in them, but didnt know whether that was the kind that would work with the broadheads. I will go by a dozen arrows and broadheads and practice with some of the old ones. What kind of target should I ask for? I will ask if they can tune my bow. Thanks for the info, and any farther advise would be great. Thanks.. bcat
 

REDBEARD

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Joined
Feb 19, 2001
Messages
33
Location
the high country, PA
bcat,

if you are shooting with a release aid, then the string nocking point should be set 1/8" high of square...no more, no less.....if it is at all possible, try to get arrows with a slight helicle or offset, you will need it when shooting fixed blade broadheads...hint...if ye buy broadheads such as Zwickey, Magnus, Delta Snuffer, the two blade design, you can rough shoot into foam targets, and resharpen them with a fine bastardfile, you can do this because they are not surgical precision stainless steel...but the two bladers NEED helicle or offset fletching or vanes in order to fly right.....just get any good foam target, you can even put some bails behind it....

hint: other good practice sessions are taking your "half bent" arrows and some old broadheads or such, and heading out in the field and trying to whack the hell outta grass clumps, stumps etc.....you'll get to know yardage real quick...be sure to shoot into slight hillsides as you wont loose as many arroz.......

Im going to sketch you up some diagrams and email them to you for your bow setup....

most of all HAVE FUN!!

welcome to Archery!

REDBEARD
 

rthrbhntng

New member
Joined
Dec 29, 2000
Messages
38
Location
Phoenix, AZ.
Bcat,
Very rarely (unless you are real good at setting up bows) will a broadhead fly to the same point as the target field point.
The bow will have to be tuned to perfection and there are very few people that take the time to do this.
The best way to overcome the difference in point of impact is to buy a set of broadheads that are the same as the ones you will be hunting with and using them to sight in your bow with the broadheads on. There is a target on the market called the "Block" and it is a great target to shoot at with broadheads. Real easy to pull the arrows out of.
If you do decide to use the practice broadheads as backups to hunt with make sure you sharpen them. It is also a good idea to check the sharpness on all your broadheads.
The most common difference in broadhead arrows versus target arrows I have seen on bows that are not perfect is that the broadheads fly lower and to the right.
A bow that is shooting under 250 fps isn't that hard to set up to shoot both tips in the same place. Any real good shop should be able to tune your bow. If it is shooting faster than that it takes a lot of time to get it perfect.
Steve
 
Yeti

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