Mountain Bike

MTlionchaser

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Nov 9, 2013
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Looking for recommendations on purchasing a Mountain Bike to use more for working out. Thanks!!
 

neffa3

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CL older high ends. Like 10+ yrs old. I really like Yeti, but santa cruz is sweet too.
 
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nrpate05

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I think mountain biking is one of the best forms of exercise and great cross training for hunting. If you're not picky any of the big names make great bikes. Head to a local bike shop, talk to the sales people and test ride a few to see what works. Be sure to do your research first so you have an idea of what you're looking for. They can be fun hunting tools as well. A friend and I hunt turkeys in a place where the forest service road is closed to vehicles for most of the season, but is open to bikes. You can cover a lot of country and be very mobile on a mountain bike.
 
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JLS

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You can find great deals on full suspension bikes if you shop around on Craigslist. Better bikes do make it more fun and easier to ride. I don’t have any nostalgia for the bike I learned on.

Plan on spending a hundred bucks a year for tuneups, tires, etc. I love mountain biking, and it’s a fantastic strength and cardio work out.
 

wllm1313

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If you are riding pavement get whatever...

If you are actually going to be mt biking on single track do yourself a huge favor and get something decent. I think $900-1500, is the sweet spot for a used bike that will have enough life let in it to keep you riding for years and decent components that you won't get super frustrated.

Basic bike buying overview.
Good brands : Yeti, Kona, Specialized, Pivot, Jamis, Salsa, Santa Cruz, Felt, Ibis
Brands I would stay away from: Giant, Trek (not because they are bad bikes, but because they make cheepie models for bike shops and it's easy for a beginner to get a crappy ride because you don't know what to look for, the good brands only make higher end bikes so pretty much everything they offer is going to be decent.

Frame
-Will be either carbon or aluminum... carbon is lighter but way more expensive, you don't need carbon unless you are racing, but at the same time you don't want a stupid heavy bike. You will be fine if you purchase from top in manufactures, they generally don't make stupid heavy frames

Wheels
sizes are 26, 27.5, 29 (bigger wheels help you roll over rocks and logs, small provide better corning) 26 is a bit defunct now 27.5 is kinda the standard

Components (Brakes/gear sets/shifters)
Every manufacturer makes different tiers of components, you are going to want mid level components. All shifters work great in a parking lot, high end shifters will allow you do downshift when you suddenly come to a hill are unprepared and putting a bunch of torque on your crackset. When your test riding a high-end shifter feels like you hit a button and are instantly in a different gear, low end fell like you are pushing/feathering the chain into a different gear.

Breaks- higher end are more responsive, won't get bubbles as easily.


105289

Shocks- Rockshoxs and Fox are the standard

Find a frame that fits you, but generally this is what your looking for...
https://denver.craigslist.org/bik/d/denver-2010-yeti-575-xl-hardly-used/6865819366.html
 

neffa3

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If you're really tight on money, I've spend 100's of hrs riding entry level mt bikes (think caliper brakes and grip shifters), it just makes everything more difficult and less enjoyable. But I justified it because in the end I'm trying to get in better shape, so the harder it was the better shape I was getting in, and the less comfort was justified because on a packout you need to accept the "suck" and shitty mountain on a long ride is the definition of "suck" it'll be good practice.
 

wllm1313

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If you're really tight on money, I've spend 100's of hrs riding entry level mt bikes (think caliper brakes and grip shifters), it just makes everything more difficult and less enjoyable. But I justified it because in the end I'm trying to get in better shape, so the harder it was the better shape I was getting in, and the less comfort was justified because on a packout you need to accept the "suck" and shitty mountain on a long ride is the definition of "suck" it'll be good practice.

Gotta love a sufferfest bike... top of leverich outside of bozeman. Front shocks had completely seized, could't shift into the big ring, pedal cages..hand-me-down from my dad who road porcupine rim and slick rock on this bad boy.

A bike like this could be had for $100 or less
105302
 

JLS

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If you're really tight on money, I've spend 100's of hrs riding entry level mt bikes (think caliper brakes and grip shifters), it just makes everything more difficult and less enjoyable. But I justified it because in the end I'm trying to get in better shape, so the harder it was the better shape I was getting in, and the less comfort was justified because on a packout you need to accept the "suck" and shitty mountain on a long ride is the definition of "suck" it'll be good practice.
You can also hike the PCT wearing cotton tighty whities and boots that don't fit if you want to build intestinal fortitude.
 

Mthuntr

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I've been riding an entry level Raleigh Talus 29'r. It's not been on much more than a few FS roads and dirt 2 tracks. Has hydraulic brakes and 24 speeds. I've done some turkey hunting on it on close FS roads which as a lot of fun. Everything about the brakes and derailleur system screams low end but it does the job and the shop I bought it from makes annual adjustments for me every spring as part of the purchase. I just put on new tires (again lower end) and it works great for tooling around but will never be a Yeti or Kona. I use it to help with cardio and it will never be more than that.
 

neffa3

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You can also hike the PCT wearing cotton tighty whities and boots that don't fit if you want to build intestinal fortitude.
I grew up backpacking in levis, tennis shoes, and tighty whities.
 
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Scott85

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Nov 22, 2018
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I ride a cheaper Diamondback hardtail. I want to upgrade. I'm too new to give great advice but I would say buy once cry once. There is a lot of good info in the thread.
 

Ajax2744

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Northern Colorado
If your handy, two summers ago I got the bug to build a bike. So I scoured around and found a great deal on a frame and craigslisted new forks, rims, and bought a lot of parts on sale. If you have basic mechanical knowledge and skills you can build a bike. I built a $1500 bike for 400. And if you really want a workout try a single speed mountain bike haha
 

montexan

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Feb 14, 2017
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Billings
I'll toss my advice in since I haven't seen anyone post about gravel bikes.

I have spent many hours on bikes in the last 20 years racing xc mtn bikes and training on the road for countless hours and miles for said racing.
It is common understanding that mountain biking on trails doesn't exactly keep your hear rate pegged at a steady redline like a road ride or gravel road ride can. The main difference is the amount of coasting involved with mountain bike trails as opposed to the constant spinning you do while on a road whether it be paved or dirt/gravel.

I would look around your area for stretches of dirt roads that you can make a 15-20 mile loop out of and then look at trails available to you as well. The good thing about gravel grinding is it can be done on a mountain bike or a gravel specific setup. Another consideration when comparing the two is the upper body workout that can be gained on trails versus sitting on a saddle and pedaling your ass off down gravel roads. In the end, more calories will be burned on a road ride over a trail ride.

My mountain bike stays parked anymore now that I have a Specialized Diverge Carbon framed gravel bike. I take it on the trails as well as highways and gravel roads between here and Red Lodge for the elevation and hills.

I would plan to spend at least a G if you are serious and don't want to prick off all summer taking a bike in for repairs. Sure, there are deals to be had for way less, but you get exactly what you pay for in a bike. if you had access to a bike you could borrow before you go all in and purchase something, I would do that for sure. No sense in throwing down for a bike only to find out five rides in you hate the shit out of it.

One last thing no one mentioned.....buy some bike shorts with a good chamois (ass pad). You can even get a baggy short with the lycra setup built in these days, or amazon a pair of lycra bike shorts or bibs and wear your cool guy shorts over those so no one sees your silly bike get up. ;)
 

neffa3

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I don't have the mental fortitude for gravel grinding, but my hats off to those that do. They typically made good packers!
 
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