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I drew a once in a lifetime sheep tag at 25. Now what?

The actual season is the month of November.

There are some RMBS members who know that unit quite well and could significantly reduce the learning curve for you. They are usually sitting behind some lucky hunter in a hero shot every fall. Are you a member of RMBS?
 
What were you thinking!? You should've drawn this tag before having a baby expected!

As others have mentioned, your baby will be far more important than killing any animal. Make sure to view your time off as time for that (as originally planned), not as time off to go hunting now that you have a OIL tag.

Make sure you're equally understanding and supportive of your wife's needs as she is of your desires to go hunting. Having a newborn/young child can be very demanding and draining for a mother and can be an emotional rollercoaster. What she says now may not be how she feels after the baby arrives. Be willing to not go as much as you think you should or would like to if she is in need of your help (even if she is telling you to go).

All that said, good luck on your hunt, and share the story with us!
 
What she says now may not be how she feels after the baby arrives.

this is the primary point i was trying to get across and probably didn't do very well.

what she says before the baby arrives is no different than hearsay in a court of law - objectionable and ultimately irrelevant. how she feels after the baby comes is what matters and you better listen lest you hope to hunt again one day.
 
Congrats on the new baby and the tag, wish you all the best!

I don't have any experience with Desert Sheep hunting, I only have hunted sheep in MT and WY. That being said, I would try and connect with other past tag holders and try to learn as much as possible from them. I would ask, is this a unit that changes during the rut, as in new rams 'show up'? If so, find the ewes, and you'll find rams. Does weather play a role in when rams typically move in? Or are there resident rams in the unit?

I would get out before the baby comes for a couple overnight trips to get familiar with the country and try to find water sources. The more you scout before your baby comes, the more efficient with your time actually hunting a ram will be.

Although I haven't hunted desert sheep, I do have a lot of experience on parenting/having children during the fall. I have two sons - one born September 17, 2021, and one born 2 years later November 9. I apparently 'rut' in the timeframe from Christmas to Valentine's Day, as my close friends have pointed out...

I wouldn't trade having a child and being there with my wife for any animal or tag, ever. As others have mentioned, having a baby truly is WAY more important than anything else. Be there for your wife and your newborn. As much as a newborn can feel like a 'pet rock' for dads, the support you can provide for your wife at this transition point is super important. I know some people view it as, 'you'll only have this tag once in your life, and you can have another baby later.' But, you only become first time parents, once. And it changes literally everything. So, that's my perspective. Not saying I'm right or others are wrong in their perspectives.

My advice is to clearly communicate your plan for your hunt with your wife, but also be flexible with your plan. I know you stated your wife is fully supportive of you hunting the entire season. But, from personal experience, the mental game of being away from your child and wife pursuing a hobby during a really important time in their lives is very hard. And, sometimes the transition from the hospital to home takes more time and effort than you realize now.

Small things, if you do truly have the 'greenlight' to hunt once the baby comes, can be:

- Prepare pre-made home cooked meals in advance and freeze them. That way, your wife can have meals easily ready when you are gone. We had a meal train set up for us by some friends for both of our sons, and that was really helpful.
- Some babies breast-feed really well, immediately. Some, do not, and it is really hard on the mother if the baby isn't feeding well. Invest in some materials from a lactation consultant. Who knows, maybe that won't be a problem for you guys, but it's helpful to have information and tips/tricks beforehand.
-Do you have family or friends that can 'cover' for you when you are hunting? Having an extra set of hands around the house with a newborn is so helpful. Someone else to change a diaper, rock the baby while your wife takes a shower, etc. Make a plan, again, if you can, to have someone stay with your wife.
-Schedule cleaners to clean your house/windows within a week of the baby coming. It's helpful to come home from the hospital to an organized, clean home.
-Do you typically do any chores around the house? If so, figure out a way for someone else to take care of those for you and your wife.
-Make sure you are stocked up on diapers, wipes, and groceries before the baby comes and continue to be stocked on those when you are hunting. I know with my wife, she couldn't move a ton for about a week after our first baby, she did better with our second, but I ran all the errands during that first week home.
-Make sure all the things in the house are in working function before you go - check the furnace filters, clean the gutters, whatever. Surprises happen, but do all you can to make sure nothing goes haywire while you are gone.

There's more tidbits out there, but that's what comes to mind.

Hope that is somewhat helpful for you. Keep us all posted on how your plans evolve, and congratulations!
 
I'm 9 weeks into the journey of fatherhood, so it's all pretty fresh and I have to echo what many others have said - no matter how cool your wife is, you need to temper your expectations about time hunting. Something I didn't realize before the baby came - they want to be held 100% of the time you're awake (and much of the time you're asleep), for at least the first 9 weeks. I've managed to sneak out for a few rounds of golf that lasted as long as your drive one way to the hunt area, but I spend all week building the husband points to cash out for those couple hours.

Family visiting to help out can be a mixed bag, they can be super helpful or they can be extra work. If you're going to be out for days on end, your wife definitely needs someone helping out.

We're rooting for you! Best of luck for the hunt and the upcoming addition to your family.
 
The actual season is the month of November.

There are some RMBS members who know that unit quite well and could significantly reduce the learning curve for you. They are usually sitting behind some lucky hunter in a hero shot every fall. Are you a member of RMBS?
I am not a member yet. I have looked in to it and talked to people about it. All of them have sent me to talk to you...
 
Father of a 1 year old here. I must say your timing is... lacking. You do know how to count 9 months, right?

On a more serious note, and has been said ad nauseum, get your game face on now about prepping the house for your wife. Assume worst case scenario, which is that she won't be able to move much for a week after birth, the baby will not sleep great, and will absolutely need food at least 2-3 times during the night. Have a big container of formula in the pantry at least 3 weeks before the due date. Babies do come early... and they don't always latch well, and sometimes the milk is slow coming in.

Oh, and get that kid on a sleep training program from day 1, they work! Taking Care of Baby is what we used (I think). We started implementing it within a day or two of leaving the hospital. If your wife gets good sleep, life will be WAAAY easier.
 
Father of a 1 year old here. I must say your timing is... lacking. You do know how to count 9 months, right?

On a more serious note, and has been said ad nauseum, get your game face on now about prepping the house for your wife. Assume worst case scenario, which is that she won't be able to move much for a week after birth, the baby will not sleep great, and will absolutely need food at least 2-3 times during the night. Have a big container of formula in the pantry at least 3 weeks before the due date. Babies do come early... and they don't always latch well, and sometimes the milk is slow coming in.

Oh, and get that kid on a sleep training program from day 1, they work! Taking Care of Baby is what we used (I think). We started implementing it within a day or two of leaving the hospital. If your wife gets good sleep, life will be WAAAY easier.
Well the baby was planned NOT to come in September or November so mission accomplished on that!
 
Seriously, though ...just go with the flow. Maybe you can slip out here and there, depending on how things go or not until towards the end. Go when you can.
 
Gastro Gnome - Eat Better Wherever

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