HUNT TALK TRUCK/BAG DUMP - WHAT IS YOUR "MUST HAVE" ELK HUNTING EQUIPMENT??

Derek44

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Joined
Nov 13, 2020
Messages
251
Location
North Central Washington
Cash for the emergency kit was mentioned, but since you are staying in civilization, also cash for tips for the local waitresses and bartenders. Nothing like keeping them happy to help ensure you’re taken care of and happy after a long day in the woods.
 

Mrjaycam

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Jul 15, 2021
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7
I've been planning my first trip for awhile now and every thread I read gives me more anxiety the closer we get to October but it's also pretty exciting.
 

Spudweiser33

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Jul 18, 2021
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7
You guessed it, this fall will be my first elk hunt. We are actually going for cow elk, in Wyoming, in mid November. I have been told to prepare for sunny skies to blizzard conditions, 70 degrees to -10 degrees. There will be 4 hunters, 1 - 4x4 crew cab truck with a camper shell. We plan to stay in a hotel the whole trip. This is the specifics of my first elk hunting trip, but I figure many first timers or grizzled vets could learn from this post.

Feel free to list your "must haves" and your "nice to have if you got room in the truck". I'm talking everything from hunting packs, binoculars, spotting scopes, rangefinders, GPS, maps, clothes, boots, knives, games bags, coolers, safety gear, chains for tires, winches, tents, sleeping bags, food, etc....anything is fair game. Share what has worked well for you on previous elk hunting trips, what was a disaster, or what you wish you would have brought...Help us first timers learn from your mistakes....Share what gear you think is extremely important that most people overlook...

I know there are so many different hunting terrains and weather conditions that there is no all inclusive list, so you can be specific or broad as you like. My hope is to get a thread going that will acquire so much information/ideas that rookies and veteran hunters can read through and see something that improves their comfort and success rates on future hunting trips..

PS - For anyone newer than me at this whole "planning an elk hunt" thing (which probably isn't very many people), watch Randy Newberg's bag dumps on youtube. He gives a ton of great information on gear. That is my only contribution to this thread :ROFLMAO:.

Thanks in advance for any tips on hunting gear!
Does anybody have a suggestion for leg gaiters for a big guy? I need about 21 inches around the leg.
 

buffybr

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Joined
Oct 3, 2009
Messages
802
Location
BozAngeles, MT
The only 3 things that you really need to hunt elk is your rifle, cartridges for it, and your elk tag.

Not quite a necessity, but very helpful is a sharp knife. I had a couple of college roommates that forgot a knife and managed to gut a cow elk with their beer cans.
 

SD_Prairie_Goat

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Joined
Mar 18, 2019
Messages
1,307
Location
SE SD
Lots of great advise. I'll throw a couple odd balls out that I do:

Spare key somewhere on or around the truck just in case.

Breaker bar for truck lugs, seems like they get welded on lately with corrosion...

Lots of ammo, I usually bring 40 in the truck, 20 on the trail. Never know when somethings going to go south, or you bump your scope and have to sight it in again.

Extra water, extra ibuprofen.

Larger first aide kit in truck, smaller in pack.

Always cash in the truck like mentioned before. But also cash in your pocket.

I don't have a winch, so I have a two ton come along and some straps just in case. Never had to use it, and it wouldn't be pretty but it's there.

Saw, I don't go out to the forest land often, but a bow saw always comes with just in case. If it was more than the black hills, a mini chainsaw should be looked into.


Now just some side notes, I personally get altitude sick easily so know what that may look like. Pack a couple go to meals that are easy to prepare and you'd eat even while sick. I have trouble wanting to eat when it hits me so having something easy and tastey can go a long way. Pack water but don't forget mountain houses need water as well.

Oh and something to keep you entertained while in the truck. I use audible myself. Board like games for non drivers, stuff like that often is overlooked


Good luck and let us know how it goes!
 

Duck-Slayer

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 3, 2010
Messages
4,186
Location
great state of Idaho....
Pack Goats, Tag, Weapon of choice, food, water, and shelter lol 😂

In all seriousness the Pack Goats are number 1 with a broken back like mine, also the $30 lightweight chair from Amazon is awesome for the price and weight of it. My InReach is right up there too, for obvious reasons.
Matt
 

smhoward27

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2021
Messages
32
You guessed it, this fall will be my first elk hunt. We are actually going for cow elk, in Wyoming, in mid November. I have been told to prepare for sunny skies to blizzard conditions, 70 degrees to -10 degrees. There will be 4 hunters, 1 - 4x4 crew cab truck with a camper shell. We plan to stay in a hotel the whole trip. This is the specifics of my first elk hunting trip, but I figure many first timers or grizzled vets could learn from this post.

Feel free to list your "must haves" and your "nice to have if you got room in the truck". I'm talking everything from hunting packs, binoculars, spotting scopes, rangefinders, GPS, maps, clothes, boots, knives, games bags, coolers, safety gear, chains for tires, winches, tents, sleeping bags, food, etc....anything is fair game. Share what has worked well for you on previous elk hunting trips, what was a disaster, or what you wish you would have brought...Help us first timers learn from your mistakes....Share what gear you think is extremely important that most people overlook...

I know there are so many different hunting terrains and weather conditions that there is no all inclusive list, so you can be specific or broad as you like. My hope is to get a thread going that will acquire so much information/ideas that rookies and veteran hunters can read through and see something that improves their comfort and success rates on future hunting trips..

PS - For anyone newer than me at this whole "planning an elk hunt" thing (which probably isn't very many people), watch Randy Newberg's bag dumps on youtube. He gives a ton of great information on gear. That is my only contribution to this thread :ROFLMAO:.

Thanks in advance for any tips on hunting gear
Cannon
 

MTGamecock

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Joined
Sep 29, 2020
Messages
78
Location
SW Montana
I don't know where you are going in Wyoming, but for mid-November, I would be prepared for snow. Lots of snow. And if you only see a few inches of snow at the trailhead at 6000' elevation, assume there will be a foot or two up at 8000' elevation. A game sled like a Jet Sled cane come in very handy for packing out a load. You can't yank them over just any kind of terrain, but where the grades or gentle (or better yet, downhill), they can save you a ton of time and energy.

When the snow is deep, I like snowshoes. Hiking a mile in snowshoes is very tiring, but I find it less tiring that post-holing my way through deep or semi-deep snow for that same mile. Whether you use snowshoes or not, I consider trekking poles a huge benefit over dry terrain and an absolute must in snowy conditions.
 

Wypiti

New member
Joined
Sep 28, 2021
Messages
6
Optimism. Things can get western quick on a hunt.

PB Blaster for those rusted spare tire mechanisms lol. Actually use your items before your trip.
 

Wyojessen

Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2020
Messages
17
If you’re traveling from hotel every day, depending how far, I’d wear comfortable shoes to and from your hunting spot. Whether it’s crocs or sneakers, nothing feels better than slipping on different socks and shoes for the ride out after a long day in your boots.
Also, don’t wear all your warm clothes on the way to your hunting spot in your climate controlled truck. No need to be sweated up before you start hiking.
 

ammo

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2020
Messages
23
Location
Denver
Re winter gear - I rely on hand warmers every day if it's late in the season. Alpine Start for coffee in the morning (instant that is actually really tasty). I have a hard time getting enough calories at altitude so poptarts for me are a must have. Also cinnamon raisin + cream cheese bagels - you can throw em in your pocket, easy for the morning when you're going hard/fast.
 

Jim Anderson

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Messages
212
Location
Meeker, CO
All good advice. I’ll add this: I just got a Zoleo sat messenger. I gotta say it’s been a great purchase. Just spend September bear season with it.

My wife is super supportive of all my crazy adventures, but she worries. Being able to send or receive a text any time is great. Plus if there’s a change of plans or something that can be communicated easily.

Plus the SOS features if you get hurt.
 

davinski

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Joined
Jan 30, 2011
Messages
303
Location
Western Colorado
A little disposable ultralight painters tarp in my pack hardly weighs anything. It can help in a surprise overnight situation, but I've used them for countless other things. I mainly use it when quartering and butchering an elk. It just helps having more clean space to lay meat, quarters, etc. onto. Rolling half a carcass back over, it never hurts to have something clean to lay the downside back on if you want to go back in after more neck meat or whatever. The hide doesn't always cooperate. I've hacked off pieces for tent floors, bag liners, you name it.
 
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