House Bill 2676 Oregon ban on New Fur Sales

RG_Adult_Onset_Hunter

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Link to the Bill

I really do believe that anti-hunting/trapping groups aim to take away any sort of traditional subsistence option from us one small piece at a time. While the argument for this bill appears to be aimed at commercial fur raising, the nature of the bill would also hit fur trappers (fur trapping is still legal in Oregon).

It is illegal to sell meat from a game animal, but fur is different. My question to the hunting and trapping community is, should they be? Does this bill chip away at our values, or does it bring the value system for the whole animal into the same space?

Let's try to have a non-lefty-vs-righty conversation about this.
 

COEngineer

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That's an interesting point about the meat vs the fur. I assume that historically, no one cared about the predators/rodents (most furs), so the ban on sale of meat covered most of the 'game' species. Nowadays, I don't think there are enough trappers to make any major impact on wildlife populations (except in very small focus areas - golf courses, irrigation ditches, etc).
 

Hunting Wife

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I feel like fur was the commodity that built much of North America in the beginning. It was never not a commodity. I’m not sure, but I don’t think you can really say the same about game meat.

I feel like some of these bills do discriminate against subsistence cultures/lifestyles. In addition to just wasting animals that would otherwise still be killed as nuisances but not utilized.

Wonder if they realize why Oregon’s emblem is a beaver? It isn’t because they are cute.
 

rtraverdavis

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Thanks for posting this. The way this bill is written, it would make most of the flies in fly shops illegal to sell. And leather (the stuff under the fur) is still cool to sell too, which is interesting in that by exempting leather it avoids what would certainly be major opposition from leather producers—ranchers. In that way, it seems like it’s aimed at chipping away at our values in that it targets the smallest user group—trappers. I’m doubtful this bill was written with parity between selling wild meat and selling wild fur in mind, nor consideration for the NAM and history or market hunting.
 

Shangobango

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Raccoon meat is worth much more than the pelt down here at this time.

That isn’t saying a lot being that you can’t give southern fur away right now.
I don't think there are enough trappers to make any major impact on wildlife populations (except in very small focus areas - golf courses, irrigation ditches, etc).
That depends on the species and how motivated the trappers after them are.

I can tell the difference in otter, raccoon, fox, and beaver populations in my stomping grounds since the fur market tanked again after it’s last spike in ‘11-‘13.

Of course canine distemper should be along anytime now to even the raccoons and foxes back out.
 

Jstearns

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Feb 23, 2021
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Link to the Bill

I really do believe that anti-hunting/trapping groups aim to take away any sort of traditional subsistence option from us one small piece at a time. While the argument for this bill appears to be aimed at commercial fur raising, the nature of the bill would also hit fur trappers (fur trapping is still legal in Oregon).

It is illegal to sell meat from a game animal, but fur is different. My question to the hunting and trapping community is, should they be? Does this bill chip away at our values, or does it bring the value system for the whole animal into the same space?

Let's try to have a non-lefty-vs-righty conversation about this.
I believe you have a great point about fur sale not really being different than meat sale. But my thought is that your trappers are the one doing the most for our predator control. You need to control both. If you look into turkey populations back east most are saying it’s because most the houndsmen have stoped chasing coons because of property lines.
 

MarvB

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How about the sale of taxidermy items in general? In Cali for example I believe you cannot sell mounts, skulls, horns, etc. only gift them ( unless this has changed recently).
 

LuketheDog

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Does this bill chip away at our values...

Let's try to have a non-lefty-vs-righty conversation about this.

It absolutely chips away at traditional values, that's the goal. But, can you really have the conversation about losing those values without discussing who is attacking them? There is more discussion happening about banning any recreational trapping in Colorado as well, and below is an excerpt from the proclamation for MeatOut Day our governor here in Colorado just made. Read this and tell me his administration is not targeting 'traditional values':

“WHEREAS, removing animal products from our diets reduces the risk of various ailments, including heart disease, high-blood pressure, stroke, various cancers, and diabetes; and

“WHEREAS, a plant-based diet helps protect the environment by reducing our carbon footprint, preserving forests, grasslands and wildlife habitats, and reduces pollution of waterways; and

“WHEREAS, a growing number of people are reducing their meat consumption to help prevent animal cruelty; and

“WHEREAS, since MeatOut was launched in 1985, more than 35 million Americans have explored a plant-based diet and reduced their consumption of meat, dairy, and eggs; and major food manufacturers and national franchises are marketing more vegan options in response to this growing demand;

“WHEREAS, Colorado is the proud home to farmers and ranchers alike and we recognize the importance of agriculture in the state; THEREFORE I, Jared Polis, Governor of the State of Colorado, do hereby proclaim March 20, 2021, as MEATOUT DAY.”
 
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FI460

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How about the sale of taxidermy items in general? In Cali for example I believe you cannot sell mounts, skulls, horns, etc. only gift them ( unless this has changed recently).

Sale of taxidermy can only be done in Oregon by people 65 and older, or their inheritors can sale their inherited mounts.
 
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