Big Fishing Shirt, and the Fleecing of Our Once Great Country

Nameless Range

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I have a “fishing shirt” – an old wool Pendleton flannel that I cut the sleeves off of 20 years ago. It’s redneck, but I have come to love it, though nowadays she’s getting worn out. This year, in preparation for an annual fishing trip with some high school buddies, I figured I’d get myself a new fishing shirt – one of them light and wicking button-ups offered by one of the outdoor apparel companies out there. I buy new clothes once or twice a decade, and so I am not a stylish fellow.

Being a uniquely shaped and sized human lump , I can’t buy shirts on the internet– I gotta try em on. Further, I feel a moral quandary going into a local store, trying a shirt on, and then going to the internet to undercut them. We went to Murdoch’s first. Took a gander at the KUHL brand shirts, which I liked. $75! Ok, so I try the local sporting goods stores. Columbia button up shirts - $80. Mountain Hardware - $65. Orvis - $90. Huk - $55. Every one of them made in Vietnam, or China, or India.

IMG_2382.jpg

So I suppose I oughta bite the bullet. They only cost as much as a half a tank of gas anyway.

Any recommendations? I’m not buying one of those fruity thin skinned hoodies. Ideally, the purchase needs to be able to seamlessly make the transition from river to inebriated campfire with little self-concern. Or maybe I should just ride out the wooly – it took me a decade of wear before the wool became soft enough that a day of fishing didn’t result in nipples as raw as an elk quarter on a meat shelf.

IMG_2384.jpg
 
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Ben Lamb

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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. That Pendleton has mojo. The Columbia's, etc don't.

The quick dry stuff is awesome, but if you do know your size, then look on ebay for used. The cost of those shirts is way up and it makes it so a middle aged feller can't walk around in fishing attire like it was 2002 anymore. Zipoff pants, once the height of fashion, are now relegated to informal affairs instead of commission meetings and legislative sessions. Cargo shorts get mocked by those less comfort-oriented and our shirts have to look like some kind of NASCAR sponsorship.

Phooey to all of that I say. Rock the wool, wear the sweaty, nasty boonie & wet wade in cutoffs like God intended us too. Own your heritage. #Chadfashionforlife
 

Nameless Range

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All good advice. Thank you.

A guy could buy a Pendelton Wool Shirt, and cut the sleeves off, for the price of one of the fancy fishing shirts.


Do you think Pendelton would honor the lifetime warranty if they knew I cut the sleeves off?
 

Nemont

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Wind Gypsy

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I can understand the draw to the "larry the cable guy" customized shirts but I rarely do much outside without full sleeves these days. With the right material it's actually cooler (in the sun), you don't need to lather on sunscreen, and you can treat with permethrin to help with ticks and bugs. No brainer.
 

noharleyyet

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Nov 15, 2004
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TEXAS
I have a “fishing shirt” – an old wool Pendleton flannel that I cut the sleeves off of 20 years ago. It’s redneck, but I have come to love it, though nowadays she’s getting worn out. This year, in preparation for an annual fishing trip with some high school buddies, I figured I’d get myself a new fishing shirt – one of them light and wicking button-ups offered by one of the outdoor apparel companies out there. I buy new clothes once or twice a decade, and so I am not a stylish fellow.

Being a uniquely shaped and sized human lump , I can’t buy shirts on the internet– I gotta try em on. Further, I feel a moral quandary going into a local store, trying a shirt on, and then going to the internet to undercut them. We went to Murdoch’s first. Took a gander at the KUHL brand shirts, which I liked. $75! Ok, so I try the local sporting goods stores. Columbia button up shirts - $80. Mountain Hardware - $65. Orvis - $90. Huk - $55. Every one of them made in Vietnam, or China, or India.

View attachment 229555

So I suppose I oughta bite the bullet. They only cost as much as a half a tank of gas anyway.

Any recommendations? I’m not buying one of those fruity thin skinned hoodies. Ideally, the purchase needs to be able to seamlessly make the transition from river to inebriated campfire with little self-concern. Or maybe I should just ride out the wooly – it took me a decade of wear before the wool became soft enough that a day of fishing didn’t result in nipples as raw as an elk quarter on a meat shelf.

View attachment 229556
Get a 15 dollar (on sale) Magellen long sleeve button up or pullover at Academy. Also a neck gaiter. Top it with that glorious Pen/flannel blowout. Good karma & you're welcome.
 
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Wind Gypsy

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I have yet to discover this despite multiple attempts with every material ever made.

I agree if the sun isn't beating on you but when it is I feel notably cooler not having direct sun to skin and it seems like sweat does better at actually cooling you down.

Maybe it's just my aversion to the sun?
 

neffa3

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Apr 17, 2015
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Wenatchee
I agree if the sun isn't beating on you but when it is I feel notably cooler not having direct sun to skin and it seems like sweat does better at actually cooling you down.

Maybe it's just my aversion to the sun?
Maybe it is more personal preference. I must prefer even a infinitesimal increase in air flow over my skin as opposed to covered. I feel like I'm in an oven with a shirt on, even with the lightest most "breathable" fabric.
 

Wind Gypsy

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Mar 12, 2017
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Maybe it is more personal preference. I must prefer even a infinitesimal increase in air flow over my skin as opposed to covered. I feel like I'm in an oven with a shirt on, even with the lightest most "breathable" fabric.

I think part of it is embracing or at least accepting that feeling of fabric sticking to your skin, which doesn't come naturally.

Maybe it's just engrained in my brain because I spend a lot of time in the SW on outdoor construction projects where our safety training pushes long sleeves as a positive in combatting heat illness.
 

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