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Are you stupid? Fecl's here to help, introducing Feclnogn Daily Thread to make you s

feclnogn

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In order to impruv the intelygnce of the hunttalk forum I, feclnogn have decyded to make you foulks smarter. I will now post a daily thread that shuld make every1 smart and =

todays topac is,

Stacked, Packed Nanowires Hold Triplexed Megadata


A novel transistor architecture using molecular-scale nanowire memory cells holds the promise of unprecedently compact data storage.


Memory on a nanowire: Simulation of memory cells holding 3 bits of data each formed spontaneously on an indium oxide nanowire by a process created at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and the NASA Ames Research Center. (Image courtesy University Of Southern California)

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Related sections: Matter & Energy
Computers & Math



Researchers at the University of Southern California and the NASA Ames Research Center have successfully tested a self-assembled molecular memory device they say has the potential of holding 40 Gigabits per square centimeter -- a far greater density than any achieved on silicon.

Furthermore, says Chongwu Zhou, an assistant professor in the USC Viterbi School department of electrical engineering, because of the self-assembly feature, such ultra dense memory devices can likely be cheaper than the silicon flash memories now widely used in digital cameras, "memory sticks" and other applications.

According to a recent paper by Zhou and his group in Applied Physics Letters describing the technology, the density is achieved by the nanoscale (one millionth of a millimeter) size of the building blocks used,

( Ten nanometers is 0.0000004 inch; an average bacterium is about 1000 nanometers long; the smallest known virus about 20 nanometers long).


Full smart storie hear


Share the love, not your wives
 

Ovis

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And for some reason I was thinking Ten nanometers was .0000025 of an inch. What do you know, you learn something new every day.

I can't wait until tomorrows Feclnogn Daily Thread!
 

Doug

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Stacked, Packed Nanowires Hold Triplexed Megadata

Those stacked, packed nanowires sound kinda like the plastic thingy that holds a six pack together. I feel smarter already. ;)
Doug
 

ELKCHSR

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I need one of those...
 

danr55

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Hmmm???????? Only 10 nonometers long.. imagine that something smaller that Moosie's .. Nevermind.. Let's just say it leaves more room in the ol' soup pot..

Thanks Fecl..

:cool:
 

Hangar18

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I am really trying to be smarter by reading this, but I am having trouble. As soon as I read 'Stacked, Packed Nanowires' I keep seeing the word 'mammories' in place of 'nanowires'. I blame this on growing up at the foot of the 'Tetons'.
 
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