Finalized gear list

Outdoor Junkie

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Hello all,

I came onto the forum in early January and asked for some advice about my gear list, since I was significantly over my target weight. I received a ton of great feedback, which has helped me get to where I am at currently. My final pack weight is 57 pounds, including 2 liters of water, food, pack, rifle and all of my gear for 7 days. We are also doing a late July scouting trip for 3.5 days, and my pack weight for that trip will be 41 pounds. I just wanted to attach that list, so that maybe someone else could benefit from all the feedback I received when I was assembling this list. Just wanted to pay it forward.

Hapy Memorial Day! Thank you to all who have served!
 

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rjlefty3

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Thank you for sharing this! I haven't had much experience on backpacking trips yet, so your previous post and feedback from others was immensely helpful to set up my list. There are a ton of things that sound great to bring but don't really add anything and are easily cut, while other things I wouldn't have thought about and hated myself the whole time because of it.
 

Bambistew

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Looks like a really solid list! Good work. The only way you're going to get much lighter is to spend some serious $$$ to save oz. or go without somethings. Less than 60lbs with a rifle, water, spotter is pretty impressive considering you (or I) have everything you would ever need on a hunt...

I use a space blanket instead of a ground cloth, save you a few oz.
Look into the gravity filters, they're a 2-3 oz, and no pumping...
I used to pack a 3 or 4 gallon bag like you intend to. They're great for a base camp. If you intend to move a bit, a couple 3 liter bags may work better, but it all depends on water availability.
I use a cup occasionally, and get by with a small 8oz plastic one, less than an oz.

Just an Iphone and no camera? You making Bob bring one? :)

I'd toss in some Tenacious tape... somehow mine was misplaced last weekend, and the hole in my air mattress was no laughing matter... luckily I had a bit of duct tape made the patch work for a while.
 

ccc23454

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if your scouting same area, stash a few things for later. fuel/water at least: (never stash anything you cant do without) but a couple litters of bottled water can go a long way when water is hard to find, plus allows you to cut extra weight when hunting
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Thanks Bambi. Yeah, from here on out, all the weight that is cut will come at a pretty serious cost. I really like my pack, but it's over 8 pounds, so there is weight that can get cut there. My spotter, Binos and tripod are definitely not the lightest on the market, but I really like the quality of the Theron glass for the money. Also included is the fact that I'm a married guy with two kids and you need to draw the line on "fun money" somewhere. The tent also isn't the lightest on the market, but for a 3 man tent, it's pretty good. We're both brining tripods and rifles. If we would have agreed to one of each, we would have been at ~ 50 pounds. With that said, this is our first lightweight backpack hunt and I'd rather err on the heavy side the first go around and then cut the gear list after that. I'm really looking forward to this! You and a couple other guys were really helpful in getting this list cut down. Thank you for all that advice, it's truely appreciated.

In regards to tennacous tape, I've never heard of the stuff. Is it a must bring item?

In regards to the iphone, I was planning on turning it off all week, except in case of emergency and also for use as a camera. Would you reccomend bringing a camera as well? I had that on the original list, but cut it when I was tryigng to get to my goal of 55 pounds.

Thanks!

Looks like a really solid list! Good work. The only way you're going to get much lighter is to spend some serious $$$ to save oz. or go without somethings. Less than 60lbs with a rifle, water, spotter is pretty impressive considering you (or I) have everything you would ever need on a hunt...

I use a space blanket instead of a ground cloth, save you a few oz.
Look into the gravity filters, they're a 2-3 oz, and no pumping...
I used to pack a 3 or 4 gallon bag like you intend to. They're great for a base camp. If you intend to move a bit, a couple 3 liter bags may work better, but it all depends on water availability.
I use a cup occasionally, and get by with a small 8oz plastic one, less than an oz.

Just an Iphone and no camera? You making Bob bring one? :)

I'd toss in some Tenacious tape... somehow mine was misplaced last weekend, and the hole in my air mattress was no laughing matter... luckily I had a bit of duct tape made the patch work for a while.
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Hey MH,

Is this in reference to another thread? I always bring a compas. I learned how to navigate with a compass when I was a kid and I think it's a must for a back country trip. Also, I've learned that electronics have problems at the worst possible time. If the GPS craps out, the compass is definitely a neccessity.

Compass....Nice....
 

Bambistew

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Tenacious tape is like duct tape, but better... works for fixing holes in tents, air mattresses, clothing, etc. Much better than duct tape.

I usually always bring a camera, unless I'm hunting with someone who has a better one than me. Memories fade, pictures last much longer. I look at pictures from hunts from 20 years ago and wish I had taken more pictures.

If you're going to bring your phone, download the google earth maps and USGS etc.

Compasses also crap out... better bring a spare. ;)
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Thanks CCC,

Stashing the fuel is a good idea. With that siad, we have almost 2 months between scouting and hunting. I'm pretty sure any stored water would be getting really funky after that long. Maybe bottles water, but filtered water probably would get pretty nasty in 2 months. Any expeience this? I'm open to the idea, but definitely want to make sure that the water will stay good for that long.

if your scouting same area, stash a few things for later. fuel/water at least: (never stash anything you cant do without) but a couple litters of bottled water can go a long way when water is hard to find, plus allows you to cut extra weight when hunting
 

DirtyDan

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A compass and a whistle are you crazy?
Seriously, looks like a solid list. It's been said before but preparing for these trips is half the fun. Looks like you forgot TP and emergency fire starter. Not sure if your tent has a bathtub floor. If so, I'd loose the ground sheet. Might want to consider adding a small tarp to your kill kit. Nice to be able to lay meat out on while stuffing into your game bags/pillow cases. Also doubles as rain cover while glassing if the weather turns.
Good luck and have fun.
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Forest Lake, MN
Thanks Dan,

In regards to TP, I have dried out 30 of the presaturated butt wipes, which weigh 1.8 oz. In regards to the emergency fire starter, we considered this, but we will both have 2 lighters with us and we've built over a hundred campfires with just a lighter. I feel certain that I could start an emergency lighter without the aid of a wetfire, even in the worst of conditions. Also, our tent does have a bathtub floor, but it is fairly thin material ( similar to a lot of light wight tents) and I'd rather carry the extra 11 oz., so that the tent will hold up longer. lastly, in regards to the small tarp, we've been depating that. We use painter's plastic for our cuttng board surface when we hunt antelope and We're seriously contemplating bringing a 6' x6' piece of plastic for putting the meat on while cutting up the animal. Definitely something we need to think about.


A compass and a whistle are you crazy?
Seriously, looks like a solid list. It's been said before but preparing for these trips is half the fun. Looks like you forgot TP and emergency fire starter. Not sure if your tent has a bathtub floor. If so, I'd loose the ground sheet. Might want to consider adding a small tarp to your kill kit. Nice to be able to lay meat out on while stuffing into your game bags/pillow cases. Also doubles as rain cover while glassing if the weather turns.
Good luck and have fun.
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Forest Lake, MN
By the way, what's up with the compass references? It's the second reference to this on this thread. Do people really not take compasses anymore or is this in reference to a difference thread that I may have missed?

A compass and a whistle are you crazy?
Seriously, looks like a solid list. It's been said before but preparing for these trips is half the fun. Looks like you forgot TP and emergency fire starter. Not sure if your tent has a bathtub floor. If so, I'd loose the ground sheet. Might want to consider adding a small tarp to your kill kit. Nice to be able to lay meat out on while stuffing into your game bags/pillow cases. Also doubles as rain cover while glassing if the weather turns.
Good luck and have fun.
 

DirtyDan

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I had a very similar thread a few weeks back and it turned out to be a big deal carrying a compass, whistle, and mirror. I never go into the woods without one. Check out "pack dump" thread. There is some great advise you may have overlooked. I didn't catch the baby wipes.
 

MinnesotaHunter

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Gem Lake, Minnesota
Hey MH,

Is this in reference to another thread? I always bring a compas. I learned how to navigate with a compass when I was a kid and I think it's a must for a back country trip. Also, I've learned that electronics have problems at the worst possible time. If the GPS craps out, the compass is definitely a neccessity.

Yeah it was. Didn't mean to distract. Your list looks pretty good, IMO.

I would also recommend the basecamp filters. You might be able to get away without the bladder by using one. Heck, you are close enough you are more than welcome to check out my Katadyn Base Camp.

Was there a reason you went with the Stoic midlayer vs the Patagonia. On a long hunt, the higher % of merino might smell nicer, and is lighter. In reality it is probably a horse a piece.

I am actually a big compass and map guy. I do have way more experience navigating by terrain association and dead wreckoning than by GPS. If I was forced to choose I would take a map and compass over a GPS, but thankfully I haven't had to. I really like the Suunto A-30s, tough to beat for the $, and they make one graduated to USGS scale.
 

Bambistew

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By the way, what's up with the compass references? It's the second reference to this on this thread. Do people really not take compasses anymore or is this in reference to a difference thread that I may have missed?

If you think you will need a compass, bring one.

Interesting that you feel that fire starter is not necessary. IMO this is probably one of the most critical survival items you can carry. A couple cubes of Wet Fire (or similar) weigh nothing, take up as much space as a couple Jolly Ranchers, and are true lifesavers . Tough to find your way out with your compass when you've died of hypothermia. ;)

Also starting a fire when you really need to start a fire is much different than having time and skills to do so. Ever tried to start a fire when you can't even work a lighter, or work the zipper on your coat?
 

ccc23454

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Thanks CCC,

Stashing the fuel is a good idea. With that siad, we have almost 2 months between scouting and hunting. I'm pretty sure any stored water would be getting really funky after that long. Maybe bottles water, but filtered water probably would get pretty nasty in 2 months. Any expeience this? I'm open to the idea, but definitely want to make sure that the water will stay good for that long.

i usually stash factory bottled waters and have no problems unless you get multiple hard freezes which shouldn't be a concern for you. just make sure you stash them good as bears like to occasionally bite to see what they are if they find them. i usually use a thin dry bag with one fuel cylinder, some paper towels folded up and vacuumed sealed(tp & emer. Fire starter) and 3 or 4 liter bottles of water if water is scarce, 2 or 3 20oz bottles if water is not much of a issue. i have stashed things like batteries, garbage bags, extra clothes, can goods, tarp etc. just a great way to save weight. i try to find a down tree and shallow bury it against it then cover it in bigger sticks or log pieces to protect it. if hunting with friends in that area usually put a small piece of flagging above it so i can mark it on their map and we can use it in emergencies and also way easier to find if it snows.
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Forest Lake, MN
Good call. I guess I wasn't thinking of it that way. I'd like to think hta tthe weather would be reasonable in mid September, but we'll be up pretty high, so you never know. I'll look into the wet fire some more.

If you think you will need a compass, bring one.

Interesting that you feel that fire starter is not necessary. IMO this is probably one of the most critical survival items you can carry. A couple cubes of Wet Fire (or similar) weigh nothing, take up as much space as a couple Jolly Ranchers, and are true lifesavers . Tough to find your way out with your compass when you've died of hypothermia. ;)

Also starting a fire when you really need to start a fire is much different than having time and skills to do so. Ever tried to start a fire when you can't even work a lighter, or work the zipper on your coat?
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Forest Lake, MN
Yeah, bottled water defintiely makes sense. It's amazing how much water actually weighs when you break down your pack weight and see that a liter is ~ 2.2 pounds. 3 or 4 liters wil weigh 7-10 pounds. Pretty crazy. Thanks for the idea!

i usually stash factory bottled waters and have no problems unless you get multiple hard freezes which shouldn't be a concern for you. just make sure you stash them good as bears like to occasionally bite to see what they are if they find them. i usually use a thin dry bag with one fuel cylinder, some paper towels folded up and vacuumed sealed(tp & emer. Fire starter) and 3 or 4 liter bottles of water if water is scarce, 2 or 3 20oz bottles if water is not much of a issue. i have stashed things like batteries, garbage bags, extra clothes, can goods, tarp etc. just a great way to save weight. i try to find a down tree and shallow bury it against it then cover it in bigger sticks or log pieces to protect it. if hunting with friends in that area usually put a small piece of flagging above it so i can mark it on their map and we can use it in emergencies and also way easier to find if it snows.
 

Outdoor Junkie

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Messages
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Forest Lake, MN
No distraction at all and thanks for helping me understand the compass references. I guess I couldn't imagine going into the remote wilderness without a compass. The little ones weigh nothing and its always good to have that reference, especially on overcast days. As far as the stoic vs. the Patagonia, it really came down to the fact that the stoic felt a little warmer in my opinion. The patagonia one has a lighter feel to it and I figured that I'd take the stoic, since it wasn't a baselayer even though it had lowere merino wool content. It's probably a horse a piece.As far as a map is concerned, Snowy Mountaineer sent me a link for a kmz file that had all the trails on it. I have this overlayed on google earth and I simply took a screenshot, put it on a word document with the margins extended to the end and printed it off. The area w are going is higher elevation, so the imagery is as good as any map (except it doesn't show details elevation contours). I laminated 4 maps (back to back) and I am using these.

I might take you up on taking a look at the basecamp filter. I see you live in Andover, which I don't think is terribly far from where I live in Forest Lake.
Thanks!
chuck

Yeah it was. Didn't mean to distract. Your list looks pretty good, IMO.

I would also recommend the basecamp filters. You might be able to get away without the bladder by using one. Heck, you are close enough you are more than welcome to check out my Katadyn Base Camp.

Was there a reason you went with the Stoic midlayer vs the Patagonia. On a long hunt, the higher % of merino might smell nicer, and is lighter. In reality it is probably a horse a piece.

I am actually a big compass and map guy. I do have way more experience navigating by terrain association and dead wreckoning than by GPS. If I was forced to choose I would take a map and compass over a GPS, but thankfully I haven't had to. I really like the Suunto A-30s, tough to beat for the $, and they make one graduated to USGS scale.
 
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