Ollin Magnetic Digiscoping System

Favorite elk hunting experience

Mattff200

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Mar 1, 2019
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141
After harvesting a cow elk in the Rochelle Hills of Wyoming last year I applied for the type 3 tag, spike or antlerless, tag along with an uncle and some people for work and last June got the results that we had drawn the tag. Unfortunately my uncle moved to Phoenix and one guy from work donated his tag to a veterans hunt. So after the knowledge I gained last year plus a couple weekends of scouting I had a plan for opening day woth a friend from work. Since he had never taken an elk I told him he was up first and after watching enough fresh tracks told him we ARE NOT doing a synchronized shot. You shoot one and if a shot is available after you shoot an elk I'll shoot. Well we headed out opening and had a mishap in the morning with the SOS button on the truck. Long story shot a wife and emergency services were dispatched but the service behind the SOS button called them off when it was clearly identified the button was pressed in error and the wife was contacted before she left the house. Made at the button pressing culprit, which shall not be identified, but relieved we were okay. While that was being dealt with a guy drove past us as we were glassing for elk before moving closer. We saw them bur he drive past us and drive the two track all the way up to where it stopped to get out. Later we found out he went around a hill and got an elk opening day. We chased after elk but they moved off on us when we realized we couldn't catch up my friend called it a day around noon since we had work the next day. On the way back we shot some prarie dogs. I just said it's public land hunting and you'll have stuff like that happen.
 
I been really fortunate in the hunting opportunities and places I get to hunt. But I have never packed out an elk by myself. Always had someone with me. Hunt by myself lots but never found an elk in a great spot when by myself. This year I got it done. It’s at the top of the list.
 
Then there was the plan for the next weekend. My friend wanted to camp our Saturday night and hunt Sunday. Well having three day weekends of Saturday, Sunday and Monday and a day to burn I decided I was gonna hunt all four days, perks of being single, I would meet him to set up camp Saturday evening and then hopefully get him an elk Sunday. Well as life happened he was unable to hunt any of the weekend so I was going to hunt the whole time solo. I got to the locked gate well before 1st light and hiked in to where I killed an elk last year. I sat there for 15 minutes and then saw 5 elk feeding and working towards me. With it being open country I just got in the prone position and decided to wait them out. Unfortunately they stayed out of my range and when the went over a hill I chased after only for it to be more timbered than I thought and they popped out in a clearing out of my range and then when cattle made noise they moved quickly to private. I then hiked in deeper and saw nothing for most of the day, but had some good glassing naps. Then I decided to head back to the truck and try another spot and try again the next morning where I hunted that morning. On my way out I threw my binos on a gap in some distant timber and I saw a her of elk that may or may not be on public land. I got closer and where the flats dropped used timber to break up my outline and they were 100-200 yards on a ranch. With a good wind and the element of suprise the plan changed to wait them out and then hike back to the truck and go camp for the night. While watching the elk I saw on the ranch one of the the coolest thing happened I heard elk bugling on November 11th and there were multiple bulls. I watched a spike cross the fence line but stay out of range and the Chase a cow. While watching that I took a break from the binos and the other elk that I was convinced were going to stay on the ranch crossed the fence line. Eventually with 10 minutes of shooting light left I saw a cow elk in range. I ranged her and she was 350 yards. I looked at my dope chart and dilated my scope and got into position. The bipod was down and, I used a rock to rest the stock and I laid prone sideways on the hill. I confirmed she was a cow then put the cross hairs where they needed to be and pulled the trigger. She dropped in her tracks and I couldn't be happier. Now from the shot I lost a bit of Backstrom but she was 200is yards from a fence line so I'll gladly trade a pound of meat for no tracking. I got to her took a few selfies since I was hunting alone and the realized my head lamp wasn't in my pack so I attached my tag to her and then went back to town to get a headlamp. I got her quartered up. Game bags hanging and a load to the truck by 10:30 and I was tired so after consulting the regs and seeing you had 48 hours to get meat to camp and determining my house was my camp I went home to sleep and haul her out in the morning. The next day I made 4 trips taling the rest of the meat and the hide to get tanned all by myself. I believe I had a out 7 miles of hiking while packing her out. It was mostly flat and any bad memories faded as soon as the last load hit the tailgate. She tastes great and seeing those elk bugling before getting the shot has been my favorite elk hunting experience so far. Not too bad for a guy from Southern New Jersey who moved to Wyoming and part of that was the resident hunting opportunities.
 

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I been really fortunate in the hunting opportunities and places I get to hunt. But I have never packed out an elk by myself. Always had someone with me. Hunt by myself lots but never found an elk in a great spot when by myself. This year I got it done. It’s at the top of the list.
I'm 31 and just accept it will suck.
 
Then there was the plan for the next weekend. My friend wanted to camp our Saturday night and hunt Sunday. Well having three day weekends of Saturday, Sunday and Monday and a day to burn I decided I was gonna hunt all four days, perks of being single, I would meet him to set up camp Saturday evening and then hopefully get him an elk Sunday. Well as life happened he was unable to hunt any of the weekend so I was going to hunt the whole time solo. I got to the locked gate well before 1st light and hiked in to where I killed an elk last year. I sat there for 15 minutes and then saw 5 elk feeding and working towards me. With it being open country I just got in the prone position and decided to wait them out. Unfortunately they stayed out of my range and when the went over a hill I chased after only for it to be more timbered than I thought and they popped out in a clearing out of my range and then when cattle made noise they moved quickly to private. I then hiked in deeper and saw nothing for most of the day, but had some good glassing naps. Then I decided to head back to the truck and try another spot and try again the next morning where I hunted that morning. On my way out I threw my binos on a gap in some distant timber and I saw a her of elk that may or may not be on public land. I got closer and where the flats dropped used timber to break up my outline and they were 100-200 yards on a ranch. With a good wind and the element of suprise the plan changed to wait them out and then hike back to the truck and go camp for the night. While watching the elk I saw on the ranch one of the the coolest thing happened I heard elk bugling on November 11th and there were multiple bulls. I watched a spike cross the fence line but stay out of range and the Chase a cow. While watching that I took a break from the binos and the other elk that I was convinced were going to stay on the ranch crossed the fence line. Eventually with 10 minutes of shooting light left I saw a cow elk in range. I ranged her and she was 350 yards. I looked at my dope chart and dilated my scope and got into position. The bipod was down and, I used a rock to rest the stock and I laid prone sideways on the hill. I confirmed she was a cow then put the cross hairs where they needed to be and pulled the trigger. She dropped in her tracks and I couldn't be happier. Now from the shot I lost a bit of Backstrom but she was 200is yards from a fence line so I'll gladly trade a pound of meat for no tracking. I got to her took a few selfies since I was hunting alone and the realized my head lamp wasn't in my pack so I attached my tag to her and then went back to town to get a headlamp. I got her quartered up. Game bags hanging and a load to the truck by 10:30 and I was tired so after consulting the regs and seeing you had 48 hours to get meat to camp and determining my house was my camp I went home to sleep and haul her out in the morning. The next day I made 4 trips taling the rest of the meat and the hide to get tanned all by myself. I believe I had a out 7 miles of hiking while packing her out. It was mostly flat and any bad memories faded as soon as the last load hit the tailgate. She tastes great and seeing those elk bugling before getting the shot has been my favorite elk hunting experience so far. Not too bad for a guy from Southern New Jersey who moved to Wyoming and part of that was the resident hunting opportunities.
Congrats, for sticking with it! Nice cow, beautiful country. I like how you said, "last load at the truck and all bad memories fade."
 
Then there was the plan for the next weekend. My friend wanted to camp our Saturday night and hunt Sunday. Well having three day weekends of Saturday, Sunday and Monday and a day to burn I decided I was gonna hunt all four days, perks of being single, I would meet him to set up camp Saturday evening and then hopefully get him an elk Sunday. Well as life happened he was unable to hunt any of the weekend so I was going to hunt the whole time solo. I got to the locked gate well before 1st light and hiked in to where I killed an elk last year. I sat there for 15 minutes and then saw 5 elk feeding and working towards me. With it being open country I just got in the prone position and decided to wait them out. Unfortunately they stayed out of my range and when the went over a hill I chased after only for it to be more timbered than I thought and they popped out in a clearing out of my range and then when cattle made noise they moved quickly to private. I then hiked in deeper and saw nothing for most of the day, but had some good glassing naps. Then I decided to head back to the truck and try another spot and try again the next morning where I hunted that morning. On my way out I threw my binos on a gap in some distant timber and I saw a her of elk that may or may not be on public land. I got closer and where the flats dropped used timber to break up my outline and they were 100-200 yards on a ranch. With a good wind and the element of suprise the plan changed to wait them out and then hike back to the truck and go camp for the night. While watching the elk I saw on the ranch one of the the coolest thing happened I heard elk bugling on November 11th and there were multiple bulls. I watched a spike cross the fence line but stay out of range and the Chase a cow. While watching that I took a break from the binos and the other elk that I was convinced were going to stay on the ranch crossed the fence line. Eventually with 10 minutes of shooting light left I saw a cow elk in range. I ranged her and she was 350 yards. I looked at my dope chart and dilated my scope and got into position. The bipod was down and, I used a rock to rest the stock and I laid prone sideways on the hill. I confirmed she was a cow then put the cross hairs where they needed to be and pulled the trigger. She dropped in her tracks and I couldn't be happier. Now from the shot I lost a bit of Backstrom but she was 200is yards from a fence line so I'll gladly trade a pound of meat for no tracking. I got to her took a few selfies since I was hunting alone and the realized my head lamp wasn't in my pack so I attached my tag to her and then went back to town to get a headlamp. I got her quartered up. Game bags hanging and a load to the truck by 10:30 and I was tired so after consulting the regs and seeing you had 48 hours to get meat to camp and determining my house was my camp I went home to sleep and haul her out in the morning. The next day I made 4 trips taling the rest of the meat and the hide to get tanned all by myself. I believe I had a out 7 miles of hiking while packing her out. It was mostly flat and any bad memories faded as soon as the last load hit the tailgate. She tastes great and seeing those elk bugling before getting the shot has been my favorite elk hunting experience so far. Not too bad for a guy from Southern New Jersey who moved to Wyoming and part of that was the resident hunting opportunities.
Nice job! Cool story! Hunting solo has its rewards and challenges. Some of my best memories and animals taken have been when solo. Just know when you get the deal done the inner fortitude has to kick in to get the prize to the truck. All the soreness and aching muscles are earned but worth it.
 
My family didn't hunt, so I didn't get into hunting until I was in college and went hunting with one of my roommates. The first year I shot a spike muley buck and the second year I shot a 5x5 bull elk and that got me hooked on hunting.

Shortly after I moved from Colorado to Montana I bought a couple of horses, and for the next 20 years they got me back into good elk country every season and packed out my elk along with a couple of bighorn rams and three Shiras bull moose. Most of my hunting has been solo, and I couldn't have done many of them without my horses.

I've had many great hunts, and there are stories and memories from all of them, but other than the size of their antlers, I don't really have a favorite elk hunting experience.
 
Mattff200 sounds like a great hunt, congratulations on your success and enjoy some fine eating
 
My family didn't hunt, so I didn't get into hunting until I was in college and went hunting with one of my roommates. The first year I shot a spike muley buck and the second year I shot a 5x5 bull elk and that got me hooked on hunting.

Shortly after I moved from Colorado to Montana I bought a couple of horses, and for the next 20 years they got me back into good elk country every season and packed out my elk along with a couple of bighorn rams and three Shiras bull moose. Most of my hunting has been solo, and I couldn't have done many of them without my horses.

I've had many great hunts, and there are stories and memories from all of them, but other than the size of their antlers, I don't really have a favorite elk hunting experience.
You must be a stud!! You're correct, all my hunts are great memories, even the unsuccessful ones. Memories and lessons learned.
 
My favorite elk hunts are ones with my sons and being with them, yes it adds something to it when they're successful. My favorite personal elk hunting experience was a trip I took solo. I planned on it being more of a scouting trip and then going back later with one of my sons. Well, luck was with me and it turned into a long stalk on a group of elk that ended with a 200 yard shot on a 7x7. I didn't haul 120# pack trips out and get it done quickly, I never would have been capable of that, but after 5 trips in some fortunately pretty mild terrain I was back at camp. I was shot, my bad back and leg were complaining, but I was personally very satisfied.
 
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You must be a stud!! You're correct, all my hunts are great memories, even the unsuccessful ones. Memories and lessons learned.

Nah I'm not a stud. I'm just a guy who loves to hunt and shoot. Also I love eating elk so once they are down I will get the meat to the truck. I haven't had to but meat from the store in a couple years.
 
Mattff200 sounds like a great hunt, congratulations on your success and enjoy some fine eating
Thank you it was fun and it's nice having a good area to hunt about 60 miles from your door. Also as of now tenderloins are gone and I'm through most of the backstraps. By just pulling stuff from the freezer I've now downgraded to make deer and antelope 🤣
 
Congrats, for sticking with it! Nice cow, beautiful country. I like how you said, "last load at the truck and all bad memories fade."
I know western Wyoming gets all the attention but there is some really pretty country in NE Wyoming. It's an underrated part I'd the state but I've come to love it since I moved up here in 2019 for a job.
 
Nah I'm not a stud. I'm just a guy who loves to hunt and shoot. Also I love eating elk so once they are down I will get the meat to the truck. I haven't had to but meat from the store in a couple years.
Great story.... when that adrenaline sets in and helps with the packing. Makes the meat taste better. As I've gotten older I have become a LOT more selective on how far from the truck do I want to be before I squeeze the trigger. So, it's to the point now where I'll only hunt in the exactly the same areas. Out of several different blinds or same ridges/drainages in Colorado Unit 3 or 49 within a mile from the truck. I just can't pack out the meat like I used to. Thanks for sharing your story.
 

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