do it yourself custom rifle

BrentD

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I don't know if it is any help, but Brownells sells barreled Howa actions and probably others as well.
 

cahunter805

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With the price of the tikka or Weatherby then adding a McMillan and Timney I would also be looking at picking up a nice used custom rifle. They can be bought for a decent price usually and might be another option.
 

ImBillT

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You can actually do smithless barrel swaps with the 700’s as well. Lots of places offer remage barrels and it’s the same concept as a savage swap. For a hunting gun I’d steer clear of a jewel. They’re sweet triggers no doubt but they’re no as robust as others. From what I’ve heard, go with trigger tech if you want the best of both worlds
I haven’t owned the Jewel long enough to know about the robustness, but I really like it, and like the design as well. I have the hunting trigger that is two stage. The first stage is too heavy to adjustball the second stage all the way down to match weights, even though the trigger will adjust way down, I didn’t like it below about 1.25lbs. For a hunting trigger though I LOVE IT. Easily adjustable, two stage, consistent, etc. I’ll be buying them in the future until I experience something I don’t like about it.

The Remage isn’t exactly standard, and does require doing some stock work to make it look right. The Savages are already setup to use that way. Still, a Remage is an option if you’re so inclined. You could do it with any action really, but I’m not aware of them being out there at the moment.
 

ImBillT

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I agree on the jewel...I don't like them at all. IMO, timney, rifle basix, and even a properly worked over Remington factory trigger are better for hunting rifles. Trigger tech are awesome, but only available for rem 700 and AR's IIRC?

Which Jewel do you have? I like mine far better than my Rifle Basix ERV-3 which I find to be in the same realm as a well worked Remington with a good spring set.
 

brockel

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Remington adl $420
Trigger tech trigger $145
Bell and Carlson stock adl $280
Shilen stainless barrel. $275
Square action and chamber $300
Total. $1420

If you like a floor plate I’d go

Remington mountain rifle $850
Trigger tech trigger. $145
Shilen stainless barrel. $275
Square and chamber. $300
Total. $1570

Can usually sell the mountain rifle take off barrel for $70-$100 depending on what it is
 

SnowyMountaineer

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It's not worth doing anything but going lighter on the factory spring on a Tikka trigger in my opinion. YoDave sells replacement springs, and all of my Tikka's have had them. I've had Timney's, they're great, but the factory Tikka trigger is right there. A high end stock gives you a stiffer platform, but to me the equal (or greater) benefit is ergonomics. I know it's a pain, but if you can order 2 or 3 of your top pick (patterns) from Manners and McMillan and send back what you don't like, you'll be way ahead. They have historically offered this service, I don't know if they still do. I've owned or shot quite a few from each and I vastly prefer Manner's offerings in general, but no shade on McMillan. My favorite McMillan pattern is the Remington Classic, favorite Manners is the EHSL. Good luck and have fun tinkering.
 

Guy

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Probably worth remembering that a fellow hunted all the North American big game species over a period of a couple of decades, with one rifle:

A Rem 700 ADL 30-06, with a simple scope, and mostly with 165 gr Nosler Partitions. When he went for the big Alaskan brown bear, he bumped up to the 200 gr Partition. I think you could grab any good, reliable, 308 Win, 30-06, or similar and hunt anything in North America.


In recent years with my 30-06 700 CDL, I've taken: antelope, mule deer, elk, black bear, wolf and grizzly. I used the 165 Nosler for most, going up to the 200 Partition for the grizzly hunt. At no point on any of my hunts have I hungered for something fancier or better than my factory rifle. It has been pillar bedded, free floated, and the factory trigger adjusted to 3 pounds. It shoots sub MOA, time after time, and has been 100% reliable. Light enough for easy carry. Heavy enough to hold steady. There are similarly capable rifles avail from all the manufacturers.

It would be easy enough to pop it into a different stock, but the factory stock fits me well and looks good. I'm fine with it. I suppose if I was often hunting in a torrential downpour I'd want a 'glass stock and maybe a rust-resistant finish, but... my rifle works just fine.

Keep it simple. Spend the money on hunting trips! :)











And here's the simple rifle that was used for all those hunts in the past few years:


Get a good, solid, reliable rifle, and hunt the heck out of that thing! :)

Guy
 
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This is straight and to the point. Thank you sir.
Probably worth remembering that a fellow hunted all the North American big game species over a period of a couple of decades, with one rifle:

A Rem 700 ADL 30-06, with a simple scope, and mostly with 165 gr Nosler Partitions. When he went for the big Alaskan brown bear, he bumped up to the 200 gr Partition. I think you could grab any good, reliable, 308 Win, 30-06, or similar and hunt anything in North America.


In recent years with my 30-06 700 CDL, I've taken: antelope, mule deer, elk, black bear, wolf and grizzly. I used the 165 Nosler for most, going up to the 200 Partition for the grizzly hunt. At no point on any of my hunts have I hungered for something fancier or better than my factory rifle. It has been pillar bedded, free floated, and the factory trigger adjusted to 3 pounds. It shoots sub MOA, time after time, and has been 100% reliable. Light enough for easy carry. Heavy enough to hold steady. There are similarly capable rifles avail from all the manufacturers.

It would be easy enough to pop it into a different stock, but the factory stock fits me well and looks good. I'm fine with it. I suppose if I was often hunting in a torrential downpour I'd want a 'glass stock and maybe a rust-resistant finish, but... my rifle works just fine.

Keep it simple. Spend the money on hunting trips! :)











And here's the simple rifle that was used for all those hunts in the past few years:


Get a good, solid, reliable rifle, and hunt the heck out of that thing! :)

Guy
 

BrentD

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Old fashioned wood and blued steel. And a.30-06 to boot. Amazing. I heard they cannot possibly work, especially in Alaska.

You've done a nice variety of hunting, Mr. huntin' lunatic.
 
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I’ve tossed the same idea around. All the aftermarket “good stuff” is Mae for the 700 action so if I were to do something semi custom I would definitely use some sort of 700 action. A trued factory action or defiance if I was spending more
 

Guy

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I did have a moment, on the grizzly hunt, when I wondered if I should have brought a 375 instead... :)

I do have more rifles, but I keep using this 30-06 Rem 700 and it keeps clobbering things. Usually one-shot drops. Farthest kill with the 30-06 has been the cow elk, 2016, at just shy of 340 yards. It may not be the ultimate rifle, but it sure works.

Guy
 

Guy

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Is that an old Redfield on there?
It is! I like that old 2-7 scope. To be honest, I've replaced it with a 6x Leupold with glass that is much more bright and clear, but yes, during the Alaska hunt and before, it had the old 2-7 Redfield on it, and it served well. I still have that Redfield, and won't be surprised if it is used again someday.

Regards, Guy
 

ImBillT

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It is! I like that old 2-7 scope. To be honest, I've replaced it with a 6x Leupold with glass that is much more bright and clear, but yes, during the Alaska hunt and before, it had the old 2-7 Redfield on it, and it served well. I still have that Redfield, and won't be surprised if it is used again someday.

Regards, Guy
Those were good scopes. Far better than most of the budget scopes today. I must admit, however, that my 6X FXIII is phenomenal to look through.
 

Guy

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That's a sweet old Suburban you've got too. Something tells me you take care of your things and keep them for a long time.
Ah, I wish it was mine! But it's not, it's actually pretty beat up, and is one of two of those old beasts on the ranch where I sometimes hunt mule deer and antelope. Has a fresh 350 under the hood, so it's likely to be running a long time. Both of the Suburbans on the ranch have manual 4-speeds with that wonderful granny low-gear. I do like 'em. Very simple, useful 4x4 machines.

Guy
 

GearJunky

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I own several guns, from cheap to expensive... after every trip to the range, I come home thinking the same thing. Why would I ever shoot anything besides my tikka t3. Honestly, for a hunting rifle it just works. It shoots extremely well, its light, the trigger is adjustable and very crisp. Maybe I am too simple minded, but I can't understand why folks are building up custom rifles other than for the pure hobby aspect.
 

noharleyyet

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My name is harley and I'm a tinkerholic. I don't care how unbroken it is I'm gonna fix it.

...and it all begins with reloading.
 

sbhooper

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The main reason for a custom rifle used to be the accuracy potential. That is not really an issue anymore, as the factory rifles and ammo shoot extremely well. My rifles have been turned into "semi-custom" partly due to shooting out barrels and partly due to change of calibers. I will never buy anything but Criterion barrels,as they are phenomenal shooters. My friend with a bore scope, says that they are the best barrels that he has ever looked down with the scope.

If you want to keep a rifle on the cheaper end and still have some add-ons, I would say get a Remington ADL/SPS, test it for accuracy to determine if the barrel is what you want and then decide where to go from there. A timney trigger-which is very good for a hunting rifle- can easily be added for little expense and it is worth it. I have two, or three, as well as a rebuilt standard Remington trigger. SPS stocks are not fantastic, but the one that was on my 7 mag, was very serviceable, light and did its job. I changed it only because I got a smoking deal on a B&C stock. Factory fiber stocks can be firmed up easily with some epoxy and an addition of a bit of material. I did not change the barrel, as that rifle shoots 160 Partitions into 1/2 moa.

I am also a fan of Savage actions and their old-style triggers, which were very adjustable. I guess the accutrigger is fine, but have no experience with them. They are easily re-barreled, if the barrel does not perform up to what you want and an add-on trigger is available.

The Tikka gets a lot of good feedback, but I have no experience with them. I don't see where they need much improvement, if that is the way that you go.

Don't feel like you need to spend a lot of money, just to say that you have a semi-custom rifle. Buy only the add-ons that give quality to your setup.
 

cahunter805

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Sb has given some great info. Some simple upgrades and some bedding compound and most rifles can shoot pretty well. Hand loading is another great aspect to help tune a rifle into a shooter.

Just curious what brand of barrels your buddy has looked at? Criterion are a popular barrel especially with the savage/remage crowd and do shoot well. I prefer Bartlein, Brux, muller and rock creek. More important than the barrel is the person setting it up and chambering it.
 
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