Snowshoe Recommendations?

406LIFE

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Aug 18, 2016
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2,160
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Bitterroot Valley, MT
Gonna finally buy a pair and want to get something quality. I've rented a bunch in the past, mostly Tubbs. Probably leaning towards an MSR but for $300 I want to be sure. I'll mostly be breaking new snow running traplines. But I also want to do some of the trails in GNP and YNP.
 

Guy

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Dec 5, 2018
Messages
124
I've been snowshoeing for more than 40 years, recreational snowshoeing, backpacking, hunting, and even in the military.

Couple of years ago I sprang for a set of MSR snowshoes. Best doggone snowshoes I've ever used! Quick to put on, they stay on, light, rugged, maneuverable. Yup, I like 'em.

Can't see the snowshoes real well, but they are terrific!




Ya, they're pretty expensive, but wow... Great snowshoes!

Regards, Guy
 

VikingsGuy

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Aug 2, 2017
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Location
Twin Cities
We do a bunch of snow shoeing up at our cabin and have found the higher end models of both Tubbs and Atlas to be outstanding (I prefer Atlas, my wife prefers Tubbs) Getting the right size for the terrain/snow conditions and the weight you are carrying are very important to optimal use -- we each have 3 different pairs for different uses.

Below was a day when we had 14 snow shoers from 4yrs old to 80 yrs old out breaking trails.

IP-19.jpg
 
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wyoboypt

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Oct 4, 2017
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Do yourself a favor and get some northern lites. Lightest snowshoe on the market, and cheaper than msr , a little cheaper.
 

BrentD

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Feb 3, 2018
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In the middle
Yes, there is that, I suppose. Mashing through the cattails with them and a shotgun with a 32" barrel is an interesting exercise in exercise.
 

sbhooper

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Jul 7, 2012
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North Platte, Nebraska
We do a bunch of snow shoeing up at our cabin and have found the higher end models of both Tubbs and Atlas to be outstanding (I prefer Atlas, my wife prefers Tubbs) Getting the right size for the terrain/snow conditions and the weight you are carrying are very important to optimal use -- we each have 3 different pairs for different uses.

Below was a day when we had 14 snow shoers from 4yrs old to 80 yrs old out breaking trails.

View attachment 91443
Nice! I have been elk hunting a few times, when I sure wished that I had some.
 

neffa3

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Apr 17, 2015
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Wenatchee
For hiking I'd go with the MSR Evos, for climbing I'd do the Lightning ascent. The metal edge is a must for holding an edge in icy terrain. Hill assist bar is also a must.
 

Nunyacreek

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Dec 13, 2013
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I have had a set of the old black MSR’s for at least 12years and used both grey and black msrs a lot Spring bear hunting in AK. They are bombproof. I’ve used with the tail extensions and without work great both ways. I wouldn’t buy anything else.
 

shoots-straight

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Oct 6, 2005
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Bitterroot Valley
I've used Tubbs for over 20 years now. Same pair and they are starting to fail. My son bought the newer ones and they have improved them a bunch. They are heavier than some of the brands mentioned though.
 

F250

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Dec 9, 2011
Messages
367
Location
Vermont
The plastic/metal frame/ice grippers are great for hiking. For hunting you can't beat the old wooden frames. I've shot whitetails and caribou while hunting on snowshoes. The plastic/metal are just too noisy.
 

Threedognight

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Joined
Nov 17, 2018
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Location
Helena, MT
Found a set of MSR Lightning Ascent shoes for $199 figured I would give them a try. My cheap set failed last Spring, so these should out last me.
 

6mm Remington

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Nov 4, 2014
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Westen Montana
Forgot to add a couple things I really like on the MSR Lightning Ascent shoes is the traction bar that is essentially the frame running the full length around the shoe. It truly helps! The adjustment bar for hills is handy also and I really love the bindings. They are easy to use even with gloves on and they hold in place very well. It's a must to use a good set of trekking poles with snow baskets on them also. It really helps with balance and saves on your legs as the arms and chest are helping too.
 

SharkDog

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Jan 7, 2019
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3
Location
Denver
I have spent a lot of time in both Tubbs and MSRs. I really like the MSRs. They are a little narrower, which I find works better with my stride, and they are super light. The pair of MSR Lightnings I have I found on sierra trading post for around $100. They have the mountain line of Tubbs on there occasionally, too. If you can take the time to check once in a while, you can find a great deal.

I haven't used the evo line (full hard plastic), but I know people that love them.
 

Guy

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Dec 5, 2018
Messages
124
Forgot to add a couple things I really like on the MSR Lightning Ascent shoes is the traction bar that is essentially the frame running the full length around the shoe. It truly helps! The adjustment bar for hills is handy also and I really love the bindings. They are easy to use even with gloves on and they hold in place very well. It's a must to use a good set of trekking poles with snow baskets on them also. It really helps with balance and saves on your legs as the arms and chest are helping too.
Ya, mine are the Revo Explore, and wow... So nice to use. Light. Strong. Terrific traction. That bar that can be popped up under the boot heel while climbing surprised me. I didn't think it was going to help all that much. I've had some problems with my Achilles tendons, and that little bar helps relieve the strain on my tendons while climbing. You and I travel some steep country with a lot of climbing. These MSR snowshoes help a LOT!

Guy
 
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