YouTube Video Request - Strength Training w/ Marcus

rveen

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Jul 22, 2016
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SW Michigan
Now that I drew a Wyoming elk tag, I'd be curious to see how Marcus trains in the field with a heavy pack. Does it matter if the weight is in the pack or should it loaded directly on the load sling?

Thanks
 

aws1963

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Nov 26, 2016
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Northern California
Good idea.

I'd be interested in a pre-season training video in general. How should a "flat lander" train effectively?

At 55 years old, this coming season will be my first "back country" archery mule deer hunt in the CA Sierra's. Hunt area will be around 7800 - 8400 ft. in elevation. I will be making at least 2 scouting trips in June and July respectively.
 

Bigjay73

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Oct 28, 2017
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Denver
Not sure how Marcus does it, but I would advise against training with a "heavy" pack, depending on what your definition of heavy is. That's a ton of stress on your knees.
 

JLS

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Somewhere in the basalt rocks
It doesn't matter if it's in the bag or in the load sling. Just keep it tight to the frame.

Be smart about pack training. Start out relatively light and build strength in your legs and core before you go trying to pack around 80-90 pounds. Rock salt or wood pellets work great.

Your best approach is going to have a lot of diversity in your training. It absolutely should have some strength training involved, some higher intensity interval training (work into this depending on your level of fitness), and some lower intensity/longer duration cardio (this is a good one for a longer hike with a 40# pack).

Plyometrics are great too, be careful not to overdo them.
 

rveen

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Jul 22, 2016
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SW Michigan
Not sure how Marcus does it, but I would advise against training with a "heavy" pack, depending on what your definition of heavy is. That's a ton of stress on your knees.
Good point, I'm not as young as the camera crew!
 

rveen

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Jul 22, 2016
Messages
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SW Michigan
It doesn't matter if it's in the bag or in the load sling. Just keep it tight to the frame.

Be smart about pack training. Start out relatively light and build strength in your legs and core before you go trying to pack around 80-90 pounds. Rock salt or wood pellets work great.

Your best approach is going to have a lot of diversity in your training. It absolutely should have some strength training involved, some higher intensity interval training (work into this depending on your level of fitness), and some lower intensity/longer duration cardio (this is a good one for a longer hike with a 40# pack).

Plyometrics are great too, be careful not to overdo them.
Good to know, thanks!
 

midwesthunter

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Dec 7, 2015
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165
Location
Northern IN
Not sure how Marcus does it, but I would advise against training with a "heavy" pack, depending on what your definition of heavy is. That's a ton of stress on your knees.
Its been proven that Ruck training is easier on your body then running. When you run your putting 6-12 times your body weight on your knees, where with ruck training 2-3 times your body weight. When you train with a weighted pack, you build strength and cardio. IMO this type of training is the easiest to help those of us who live where it is realitivly flat. Start out low and work your way up. Last year I was training with 60 pounds in the pack, and it became very easy. Throw some hills in there and that will help work on your balance with an offset load on your back. Just remember to keep the load and pack tight to your back.
 

TLowell02

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Jul 29, 2015
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164
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Sedan, NM
Just make sure you have proper fitting footwear otherwise overuse injuries can start popping up in the feet, knees and hips.
 

AlaskaHunter

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Jan 20, 2017
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Location
interior Alaska
Hills are essential!

Football stadium bleachers if your in flatland country.

I like to work on endurance with a fairly light pack and build up to
all day hour hikes in the mountains at least twice a week as the season approaches,
with a heavier pack on "off days" to build strength.

Both are important, but I think building long endurance is more important than strength...especially for me at 62 years old.
 
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