Women in the outdoors

Foggy Mountain

Active member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
141
Ladies I hope it’s ok I post anything here and I’m not out of line stepping into your area.
I was wondering or perhaps suggesting, my state has a pretty successful women in the outdoors program. They host duck hunts, turkey hunts, deer hunts. Canoe, hike adventures. Oftentimes some of the events such as the turkey or waterfowl require some help so a couple able men that would assist where needed but allow the women to take charge on their day is essential and allows the event to take place.
I’ll give you a for instance, when we do turkey hunts, none of our local woman can call. That’s ok but we need to teach them and we are, how we overcome it for now and allow the women to mentor other women is have a blind set with the female hunter. The female mentor guides the hunter and a male might be caller. I know that’s not the best scenario but it’s a start.
Also on the waterfowl hunts, some might be labor intensive. Guys could do some background work to help set things than vanish.
We also offer women only hunter ed days. I feel many women feel more at ease in that environment and it’s a good thing and we have excellent women instructors that lack for nothing. I personally happen to be one of the male stand by instructors as well as mentors, deer draggers, trackers if need be and I wanna say I’m glad you’re here. Actually nothing cooler than waiting on a women in the outdoors event as sun sets to see if I get a call to come help or hearing the story next day. Good stuff
If I can help with anything or perhaps help with a suggestion don’t be afraid to ask. I want nothing more than to pass it on.
 

Hunting Wife

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Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Messages
2,799
Location
Almost North Dakota, not quite Canada
Thanks for being a mentor and instructor. You have knowledge to share and a willingness to share it. I don’t see how that could ever be out of line.

This is something we’ve touched on a little here in other discussions, but I think it bears saying again. There is a huge difference between taking a woman hunting, and teaching her how. I think a lot of programs/people focus on taking, and far fewer focus on teaching. Both have their place, but I wish the teaching style opportunities were more plentiful than they are.

Just because some aspects are labor intensive or take some skill doesn’t mean the women shouldn’t share in those aspects, IMO. It also doesn't mean help isn't appreciated. I mean, who of either gender would turn down help packing out a critter or setting up a big decoy spread? That can be a lot of work no matter who you are.

But let's take your turkey calling example...good on you for helping your mentors learn to call btw, and I understand in your example you are trying to achieve maximum success for a new hunter, so this is more tangential to your example but still true. I’ve heard real live wild turkeys make the most ridiculous sounds. Same with elk, by the way. The perception that only perfect calling works, and that you must already be perfect to try I think is a huge mental barrier in learning for a lot of people, not just women. So the women suck at calling? Great! Let them get out there and stink it up! 😁 I’m pretty sure men don’t come from the womb knowing how to sound like a gobbler. (Do you? 🤔) Watching live animals react to your calling is the best way to learn. If they run to the next county, well, you’ll just have to find more. It might be fun to include an evening around the fire practicing calling to your mentorship/hunt experience. That seems like it would be a hoot. I mean, can you imagine one evening with @Europe, @Panda Bear, @Randi, @MTelkHuntress and I, sitting around a fire with a few bottles of wine and a box of assorted calls? 🤣

Riffing off of your example here, but it’s true of most things in hunting. Very few aspects require anything close to precision and perfection; marksmanship and safe weapons handling of course, but what else really? Everything else can be learned on the fly, through trial and error. Mostly error. Giving people the tools to be able to learn and figure things out is more than half the battle, and that's where mentorship and these experiential programs are so valuable. Thanks for putting in the effort to help.
 

Foggy Mountain

Active member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
141
I’m from NJ. Sorry ladies. I agree with the showing how. Mentoring is exactly that, showing someone how to do it themselves.
After hunter ed, I also teach archery but we invite the students, some classes all women to instruct. After certified the senior instructors try to show a little more of what to look for, how to correct, diagnose. Never in an effort to be above someone but to have them know whatever we know and be an equal. No power trips.
Taking someone on a hunt is always a teaching moment. The whys, where’s, how comes, etc in order to allow that person to be self sufficient
On another front to illustrate, a young girl had taken some of our archery classes. She was small and sorta meek. At an open house at range we decided to call her a junior instructor to help. Even gave her a badge. Eventually we let her teach all by herself with us right next to her for support.
Her first student was a big gruff looking guy. Kinda looked her up n down and almost dismissed her.
She not only instructed him flawlessly but used techniques we’d shown her to demonstrate her point. Proud day watching her as it is anytime someone comes from student to teacher. That’s the only way we can truly pass it down and allow the cycle to continue.
 

Panda Bear

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2019
Messages
784
This is something we’ve touched on a little here in other discussions, but I think it bears saying again. There is a huge difference between taking a woman hunting, and teaching her how. I think a lot of programs/people focus on taking, and far fewer focus on teaching. Both have their place, but I wish the teaching style opportunities were more plentiful than they are.
Excellent point !

, can you imagine one evening with @Europe, @Panda Bear, @Randi, @MTelkHuntress and I, sitting around a fire with a few bottles of wine and a box of assorted calls? 🤣
:love:

I’m from NJ. Sorry ladies. I agree with the showing how. Mentoring is exactly that, showing someone how to do it themselves.
After hunter ed, I also teach archery but we invite the students, some classes all women to instruct. After certified the senior instructors try to show a little more of what to look for, how to correct, diagnose. Never in an effort to be above someone but to have them know whatever we know and be an equal. No power trips.
Taking someone on a hunt is always a teaching moment. The whys, where’s, how comes, etc in order to allow that person to be self sufficient
On another front to illustrate, a young girl had taken some of our archery classes. She was small and sorta meek. At an open house at range we decided to call her a junior instructor to help. Even gave her a badge. Eventually we let her teach all by herself with us right next to her for support.
Her first student was a big gruff looking guy. Kinda looked her up n down and almost dismissed her.
She not only instructed him flawlessly but used techniques we’d shown her to demonstrate her point. Proud day watching her as it is anytime someone comes from student to teacher. That’s the only way we can truly pass it down and allow the cycle to continue.
Good job and thank you for helping the women in your area.

There are several men on this forum who are not condescending--at all--but very helpful, when I reach out with a question. I thank them as well

I would also like to take this opportunity to say that Randy runs a very "female friendly" forum ----unlike some other forums which were not just female "unfriendly " but vicious. ( as some members of this forum-- myself, Pat, Walt, April, Randi, and Don will remember )

Thank you Randy, Thank you Foggy Mountain, Thank you, to all the men on the forum---- who have helped ---your daughters, the female members on the forum as well as women in your area------who want to learn to hunt.

Hunting Wife. Count me in, but do we have to listen to Sinatra ? :cautious:
 

Foggy Mountain

Active member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
141
Very glad to hear that help is available, and great job just ignoring the morons who disrespect you and moving on and helping others like yourself.
 

Europe

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2018
Messages
1,244
Kind of like a gaggle of geese, or a covey of quail? Sorry, couldn't resist.
Ugh, proof reading is a lost art. Bunch.
But, you might be on to something 😂

Dolls, Chicks, even "Broads" works for me ( and the women in my family ) In fact my granddaughter belong's to an organization called

"Great old broads for Wilderness" --- who work toward protecting and expanding public land. A lot of the "Broads" in this organization hunt public land.

and yes, they have been criticized, challenged, sworn at, and threatened for their use of the name " Broad"

I mentioned this before on the forum but the saying "I want a broad, just like the broad , that married dear old dad" was an endearing statement in our family

However, I do hate missing the opportunity of giving Salmonchaser a bad time ;)
 

WesternWyoming

New member
Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
20
Thanks for being a mentor and instructor. You have knowledge to share and a willingness to share it. I don’t see how that could ever be out of line.

This is something we’ve touched on a little here in other discussions, but I think it bears saying again. There is a huge difference between taking a woman hunting, and teaching her how. I think a lot of programs/people focus on taking, and far fewer focus on teaching. Both have their place, but I wish the teaching style opportunities were more plentiful than they are.

Just because some aspects are labor intensive or take some skill doesn’t mean the women shouldn’t share in those aspects, IMO. It also doesn't mean help isn't appreciated. I mean, who of either gender would turn down help packing out a critter or setting up a big decoy spread? That can be a lot of work no matter who you are.

But let's take your turkey calling example...good on you for helping your mentors learn to call btw, and I understand in your example you are trying to achieve maximum success for a new hunter, so this is more tangential to your example but still true. I’ve heard real live wild turkeys make the most ridiculous sounds. Same with elk, by the way. The perception that only perfect calling works, and that you must already be perfect to try I think is a huge mental barrier in learning for a lot of people, not just women. So the women suck at calling? Great! Let them get out there and stink it up! 😁 I’m pretty sure men don’t come from the womb knowing how to sound like a gobbler. (Do you? 🤔) Watching live animals react to your calling is the best way to learn. If they run to the next county, well, you’ll just have to find more. It might be fun to include an evening around the fire practicing calling to your mentorship/hunt experience. That seems like it would be a hoot. I mean, can you imagine one evening with @Europe, @Panda Bear, @Randi, @MTelkHuntress and I, sitting around a fire with a few bottles of wine and a box of assorted calls? 🤣

Riffing off of your example here, but it’s true of most things in hunting. Very few aspects require anything close to precision and perfection; marksmanship and safe weapons handling of course, but what else really? Everything else can be learned on the fly, through trial and error. Mostly error. Giving people the tools to be able to learn and figure things out is more than half the battle, and that's where mentorship and these experiential programs are so valuable. Thanks for putting in the effort to help.
HW: Totally agree on all points, especially "taking a woman hunting vs. showing her how." It's one thing to watch someone do something, but another, more effective and memorable way is to do it yourself with helpful suggestions along the way.

Foggy, THANK YOU for helping women to feel more comfortable hunting; a helping hand is always appreciated, especially with something that's important to get right when there's so much that could go wrong. Your careful consideration of others' feelings is evident in your question. As a beginning big game hunter, I'm intimidated not by the rough country (which I love) but by the sheer weight of what I'm about to do. Encouragement makes all the difference.
 

huntergirl_19

Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
63
Ladies I hope it’s ok I post anything here and I’m not out of line stepping into your area.
I was wondering or perhaps suggesting, my state has a pretty successful women in the outdoors program. They host duck hunts, turkey hunts, deer hunts. Canoe, hike adventures. Oftentimes some of the events such as the turkey or waterfowl require some help so a couple able men that would assist where needed but allow the women to take charge on their day is essential and allows the event to take place.
I’ll give you a for instance, when we do turkey hunts, none of our local woman can call. That’s ok but we need to teach them and we are, how we overcome it for now and allow the women to mentor other women is have a blind set with the female hunter. The female mentor guides the hunter and a male might be caller. I know that’s not the best scenario but it’s a start.
Also on the waterfowl hunts, some might be labor intensive. Guys could do some background work to help set things than vanish.
We also offer women only hunter ed days. I feel many women feel more at ease in that environment and it’s a good thing and we have excellent women instructors that lack for nothing. I personally happen to be one of the male stand by instructors as well as mentors, deer draggers, trackers if need be and I wanna say I’m glad you’re here. Actually nothing cooler than waiting on a women in the outdoors event as sun sets to see if I get a call to come help or hearing the story next day. Good stuff
If I can help with anything or perhaps help with a suggestion don’t be afraid to ask. I want nothing more than to pass it on.
I really want to start teaching other women how to hunt. Looking to try to volunteer with division of wildlife next year/ season. I think there is definitely demand for women teachers in this environment.
 

Foggy Mountain

Active member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
141
Check with your state to see if they have a program. The NWTF in my state also had programs. If not maybe you could help start one?
 

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