What do you do with your old bows?

TexanSam

Active member
Joined
Mar 21, 2018
Messages
224
When I was 14 or so, I bought what was at the time a 10 year old bow from a pawn shop. I then shot my first deer with it a few years later and proceeded to shoot more big game animals with it than any of my rifles.

I have quite sentimental value with this thing, but unfortunately I decided that it is time to upgrade to a modern shooter. I would like to do something with this old one, maybe put it on some sort of display on my wall, but to be honest, I have no idea what to do with it. Therefore, if anyone has any ideas, or examples of what they did with old bows, please let me know. I do have a few euro mounts of animals I have taken with this thing. Maybe I could build something like a bow rack that incorporates one of the heads...
 

pre6422hornet

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Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
461
My 2005 Hoyt Vtec is still my daily bow. I love it. Can't bring myself to trade it in or sell it to spend $$$ on a new one. It's quiet, accurate, and just keeps throwing arrows where they need to go. Unless it blows up or Hoyt stops making common parts for it I will keep it in use.

I have a 1953 Bear Kodiak that was my great Uncles, but I don't string it up anymore. I used to plink with it 20 years ago but now it is just a show piece.
 

KB_

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Joined
Jul 12, 2018
Messages
536
Location
Bozemen, Montana
I honestly wish i would of kept every bow I've ever had. luckily the favorite one I've ever had my cousin uses and kills all kinds of stuff with it. Turd wont sell it back to me. Ill be holding on to them from this point forward I think unless i gift one to somebody.
 

gouch

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Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
544
Location
SW Oregon
The only compound I ever owned, I sold. No regrets. All my recurves and long bows, including the recurve I got for Christmas in 1966 and the 6 1/2 ft. yew self-bow with elk antler tips, went away in the wildfire. One thing about a good fire is that it takes away that nagging question of "what should I do with all that old stuff I no longer use?"
 

ImBillT

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Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
2,630
So no one wants to donate an old(but sound) self bow to me?

Some technological advances should be taken advantage of, making older bows obsolete. Others really aren’t a huge deal and the bow is still worth having. I’m talking mostly old compounds vs new. I’d say that regardless of how old the bow is, if it is safe and functional, it shouldn’t be trashed. If you don’t want it yourself might find some budding hunter that could at least use it to learn a bit about bow hunting before he can or does buy himself a new bow.

My wife wanted a bow and I bought her a really nice one for her birthday the year we got married. I have never had an interest in archery before shooting her bow. He father, who had recently shattered both ankles falling off of an extension ladder, gave me his compound. It’s anything but modern, however it’ll kill just the same. I’ve my shoots just fine. It isn’t nearly as advanced as what my wife has. if I was serious about archery hunting I’d buy something else, but currently it’ll do just fine for whatever occasion I have need for it.
 

Redman

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Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Messages
981
Location
Indiana
The problem with compound bows is proper maintenance. Strings and cables need to be changed per manufacturer recommended intervals. Most people don't want to invest in the tools required and knowledge to properly use them. Technology is constantly making them to a degree better and older compounds obsolete if something breaks. The stick and string bows hold their value and in some instances increase in value.
 

Dan O

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Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
957
Location
Seeley Lake, Mt
I have sold most of my old compounds when I upgraded. The exception is my Bowtech 82nd Airborne. I attended a 3-day school at Bowtech and assembled 2 82nd's and bought one of them from the shop owner. I shot a 5x5 bull in the breaks that year (2007) with it. The box has my name as the builder which I still have. Don't ever intend to get rid of that one. My recurves I still have, one is a metal handle Bear takedown with Scheafer Limbs, A Fred Bear takedown and a Schaefer Silvertip takedown with 2 sets of limbs. My wife has her Dad's Bear Kodiak recurve. She stills shoots it once in a while along with her Bowtech Assassin and I shoot my Bowtech Experience still. I may sell the Experience to buy a new one (60 LBS) the 70 LBS is getting a little hard on my shoulder the last few years. But maybe not it shoots great turned down to 60. Time will tell lol
 

grizzly63

Active member
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
251
Shoot carp with them or hang them in the garage. When you buy 10 yr old equipment, its pretty old by the time you decide to replace it. Keep shooting the recurves until they delaminate or get sold.
 

T Bone

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Joined
Jan 8, 2001
Messages
5,125
Location
West Slope, CO
Mine end up going to people wanting to get started in the sport, either as gifts or priced extremely low.

I understand the sentimental attachments, but have no problems bonding with the new improved stick flipper.
 

nards444

New member
Joined
Jan 14, 2022
Messages
25
their just odd things to keep. Can create a wall mount and they easily sit in the corner. Sell or trade in or give it to a kid or grand kid
 

NEWHunter

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 15, 2018
Messages
872
Location
Brookfield, WI
OP, that one you have there definitely sounds like a keeper. It think your idea of hanging it on the wall as part of a display is a great way to go.

Personally, I sell mine on CL after about six years or so. The proceeds are then used on the next rig. Keeps the clutter down and reduces (doesn’t eliminate) complaints from the wife.
 

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