[email protected] h!gh buck

neffa3

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Joined
Apr 17, 2015
Messages
5,868
Location
Wenatchee
In the same vain as @SnowyMountaineer mentioned in another thread I find I'm getting more hesitant to talk about my hunts. Even the horribly unsuccessful ones (which, spoiler alert, this is). So there's not much story, other than @wa_archer and I can't crack this early season business.

Dusting up high on the hike in.
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The "trail"
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The area
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Ptarmigan
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Purdy
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Stared at this till my eyes bled
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Peaking over
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Big country
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No bucks spotted.
 
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kwyeewyk

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Joined
Feb 22, 2019
Messages
771
Location
Washington
We see the big bucks show up in the foothills on a good winter but they sure are good at hiding in those mountains. Cool pics, one of these years there will be a buck in them.
 

crock239

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 18, 2012
Messages
328
Location
Iowa
Great photos. Beautiful area.

I've never hunted [email protected], man it sure looks nice! 😉

In all seriousness, though, really enjoyed the photos, TFS.
 
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OntarioHunter

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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
2,226
Walking in that blowdown crap is hell. Been there done that. Good thing you didn't sprain an ankle or wrench a knee. Slow and sure is the key and avoid wet weather if possible. Looks like lodgepole. That stuff will be standing around for a long time to come. Only dead timber more durable is larch ... and maybe any cedar that didn't explode in the fire. The place I would have been looking for muley's is that hillside in the photo that stinks (socks). More cover over there. Probably some water too. Thanks for the beautiful pics. Made me homesick for my old digs also in the Swan Valley.

Tip: Dead standing lodgepole is great fire building stuff. Pick a skinny one that you can push over. Not only is the standing wood dry as a bone, but the bottom foot or two near the roots will be packed with pitch which all flows down after the tree dies. Whittle some of that off to get fire going. Dry lodgepole wood is fairly brittle and if small in diameter, easily breaks when stomped on. No need for an axe. In a burn or bug kill zone there's usually lots of snags to pick from.
 
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neffa3

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Apr 17, 2015
Messages
5,868
Location
Wenatchee
In love with that basin, must have been the stinky feet the deer didn’t like 🤣
Matt
We actually stomped through that basin the next day in route to another area. Almost zero sign. I mean occasionally a deer walks through it but nothing is living in it. Generally the deer are living lower in the burn. Eating new Willow growth for the most part.
 

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