Talk to me about lightening storms in the mountains

gouch

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
837
Location
SW Oregon
We were fishing in a small mountain lake when a storm suddenly came over the ridge right on top of us. We just hunkered down near the timber and tried to get as small as we could. The weird part was that the temperature dropped drastically, and we got about three inches of snow in about 20 minutes.

Not high elevation but another time we were fishing from my canoe in a place called Kelly's Slough. The storm didn't move in but rather just built up right over us. the first lightning strike was a ground strike a couple of hundred yards away. We headed for shore, laid the canoe on its side and got down behind it. We weren't dressed for rain but luckily my partner did have a poncho. The wind blew probably 40 MPH and there was quarter size hail blowing Sideways in that wind. We held that poncho up to block the hail. It still beat the hell out of our knuckles but I'm sure glad he had that poncho.
 

marksjeep

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 4, 2016
Messages
1,076
Location
Grand Jct, CO
Dang. My son and I were scouting last weekend, got chased off the rim by lightning around 10pm on Saturday. Never saw the storm building, it was completely blocked by the ridge. Heard some rumbles and checked the radar, red thunderstorm cell building 5 miles due north heading due south. Made him sit in the truck while I threw our stuff in the bed, and we drove the 11 mile dirt "road"/2 track off the rim and out of harms way.
 

hank4elk

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Joined
Jan 8, 2015
Messages
6,480
Location
SW NM
Had 2 trees hit within 100 yards of my house this week.
One juniper is totally shattered and a pinion was split in two.

About 25 years ago I sat on a bench in Layfayete Park with my coffee every morning for a week, before the full day of DC stuff.
Several folks got hit there the other day. Not a good spot to sit out a storm.
 

RealMuddyboots

Active member
Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Messages
99
So true when you know somebody killed it changes your perspective 180 degrees. Good friend rowing boat trying to get to shore, got hit and died. I've been on Missionary Ridge in nasty storm where 40-50+mph winds trees were crashing along with strikes to ground. Pucker factor got new level of definition. We hunkered down in the lee of of rock ledge with stuff blowing over our heads down the ridge. Just got as tight to rock wall as we could. Buddy was telling me in middle of storm how ground strikes can be more dangerous and can get you as fast as direct hit. Gee, thank you for raising my anxiety even more. We heard it coming fast and was able to find this ledge for cover. In mountains, the speed of storms are critically underestimated which contributes to increased risks. IMO, if you can see or hear it, find cover fast. Do not wait to see if it is going to hit your area. Too late then.
 

kansasdad

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
5,652
Location
Wichita
Over the years I’ve seen ranching family members do all sorts of risky moves with side hill tractors, deep trenching without wall supports, running live electrical connections, standing on “ladders” way above weight and height limits etc etc, with abandon. They also keep their heads on a swivel in the high country, and at the first hint of a storm building start heading down below treeline.

As cavalier as they are with farm/ranch work, they DO NOT PLAY with lightning.
 

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