Sleeping bag/ quilt temp rating for September Elk.

Scott85

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Messages
1,382
I know this has been discussed but I couldn’t find the answer that suited me.
I’m looking for a quilt for the early season. Pretty much any state, just September elk. I’m a super hot sleeper and my current quilt is a 0 degree and it’s kept me toasty all the way down to -15.
I’m currently looking at a EE 30 degree revelation quilt, I figure I can always layer if the temps drop. My early season shelter is a seekoutside DST so the goal is stay pretty minimal until a storm is forecasted. Thanks for the help.
 

amo16

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 26, 2019
Messages
132
Location
Gallatin Gateway, MT
That's probably not a bad choice so long as you have other insulating layers available. I've seen below 0 temps in September before so that's always a possibility.
 

winmag

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2018
Messages
793
Location
Colorado
That 30 degree should work then, if you have some insulating layers of clothes to wear if needed.

I’m always hunting something at timberline in September. Regularly gets down to low 30’s at night, sometimes get a foot of snow and 10 degree nights. Keep an eye on the forecast and make a decision the day you leave the truck if you have access to both.
 

Slawger42

New member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
12
Check out the UGQ Bandit 20 deg. Very well made and made in USA (Michigan) rather than China as most others. Love mine all the way until starts getting down in teens.
 

Shangobango

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2019
Messages
1,630
Location
Louisiana
I am a huge fan of my Sea to Summit EB II. I am a hot sleeper as well, just hot natured in general really. The quilt is rated for 35 degrees but I have slept down to the high 20’s in my base layers and was just fine. Weighs about 1.5 lbs and packs down super small.

The make a model rated to 25 degrees as well.
 

NDGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2018
Messages
874
I know this has been discussed but I couldn’t find the answer that suited me.
I’m looking for a quilt for the early season. Pretty much any state, just September elk. I’m a super hot sleeper and my current quilt is a 0 degree and it’s kept me toasty all the way down to -15.
I’m currently looking at a EE 30 degree revelation quilt, I figure I can always layer if the temps drop. My early season shelter is a seekoutside DST so the goal is stay pretty minimal until a storm is forecasted. Thanks for the help.
I think you'd be golden, but might want to test it if you can before applying to the field.
 

pilsner

Active member
Joined
Mar 9, 2017
Messages
170
Any quality treated down quilt over 800 fill will do nicely.
I've been all over the country in all kinds of conditions in my 20° down quilt of UQC and an insulated sleeping pad.
Been down to sub-0° temps with my puffy and beanie on and was comfy.
 

bignest

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
30
Also don't skimp the mattress pad. I think it's more important than the bag. Had a Colorado 1st rifle hunt where we got unusual low temperatures and I wasn't smart enough yet to hike back down and drop our camps elevation. We were camped on deep snow. I had an uninsulated blow up pad, a good quality 30 degree bag, and could NOT sleep. Literally was impossible. Not of one of my group of 4 slept a wink. It was like that feeling when you tried to burn your hand on ice as a kid. 10 minutes per side and you had to roll over from pain lol. Tried to eat a snickers in the middle of the night to warm up and it was impossibly frozen. My boots were so froze in the morning it took 30 minutes to get my feet in them. Actually, its one of my favorite hunting stories lol...so maybe forget what I said :ROFLMAO:. Get out there and freeze your nuts off so you can tell people about it for the next 30 years.
 

Scott85

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Messages
1,382
Also don't skimp the mattress pad. I think it's more important than the bag. Had a Colorado 1st rifle hunt where we got unusual low temperatures and I wasn't smart enough yet to hike back down and drop our camps elevation. We were camped on deep snow. I had an uninsulated blow up pad, a good quality 30 degree bag, and could NOT sleep. Literally was impossible. Not of one of my group of 4 slept a wink. It was like that feeling when you tried to burn your hand on ice as a kid. 10 minutes per side and you had to roll over from pain lol. Tried to eat a snickers in the middle of the night to warm up and it was impossibly frozen. My boots were so froze in the morning it took 30 minutes to get my feet in them. Actually, its one of my favorite hunting stories lol...so maybe forget what I said :ROFLMAO:. Get out there and freeze your nuts off so you can tell people about it for the next 30 years.
I know how to sleep in the snow.
 

Attachments

  • 4B2A5B33-0A4E-4C4E-8FE5-460EDF25A5F8.jpeg
    4B2A5B33-0A4E-4C4E-8FE5-460EDF25A5F8.jpeg
    1.6 MB · Views: 7
  • Like
Reactions: JLS

bignest

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
30
I know how to sleep in the snow.
To be fair that could be your backyard. If you were sleeping in there who took the picture? Seems fishy to me….

When I read your post I assumed you were asking for tips or advice, but now I understand you just wanted to tell us what you’re buying. Looking forward to your review and would appreciate an updated snow resume after the season. Lol just joking of course. :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

nickstone

New member
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Messages
14
I've tried quilts and not really a fan. I mostly use a WM Terrlite. I think its 25 degree, and I have a wide long so it can provide more coverage similar to a quilt
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
101,812
Messages
1,630,356
Members
31,837
Latest member
scalxndr
Top