Roast Ideas

Art Vandeley

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I'm currently thawing out an antelope roast. Would like to try something a little different rather than the typical pot roast style slow cooker recipe.. Anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks
 

Pinecricker

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I have been experimenting lately with the pressure cooker, using some dried hatch chile powder as a rub. I like the results better than with the slow cooker. More tender, and it seems to infuse the flavors in the meat a lot more. I made a muley roast the other day like this. It turned out similar to an "adovado". I want to try a gulash next.

I also grilled a roast on very low heat to about medium rare. It turned out awesome. I think the key on the grill is not to overcook it. Note that it kind of keeps cooking after you take it off the grill so, don't be afraid to take if off when its still pretty red.
 

deer_shooter

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I just did an elk roast this past weekend, though not far removed from pot roast. Beef stock, celery, onions, garlic, liberal dashes of Worcestershire and port - all into a Dutch oven for about 5 hours.
 

VAspeedgoat

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It may not be exactly what you are looking for but you can take a roast and turn it into bbq pretty easy. Put it in a crock pot with some beer, water, and spices and cook till it can be shredded. Then stir in more beer and your favorite bbq sauce and cook just a little longer.
 

Bambistew

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My favorite way to cook antelope roasts, is to marinate in a southwestern flavor mainade... aka fajita or the like spice. Make sure to coat the meat with oil of some sort, I use olive oil... it helps with the searing and locks in the moisture.

Get the grill hot as hell, sear it on all sides, then wrap it up in foil and turn the temps down and roast it slow until medium-medium/rare. Don't over cook it.

We eat wild meat about 4-5 times a week. My go to is Montreal Steak seasoning (or similar with fresh spices) and olive oil.

I am not a fan of any sort of slow cooking. It ruins wild meat, IMO. Makes it dry, gamey, and funky textured. No amount of sauce will cover nasty meat. I won't eat anything out of a crock-pot or the like, barf...

If I do a pot roast, it starts out marinated, then into in a heavy cast iron pot... hot as hell, and seared on all sides, then finished in the oven for as long as it takes to make medium rare.
 

Bambistew

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Depends on the size and thickness. I'm not very good at time. Usually just poke it and can feel how done it is. After it's seared, maybe 8-10 min a pound on 400? Medium rare is pretty sqishy, well done is firm to the touch. Can always cut into it and see how done it is.

Wish I had some antelope... Best meat there is.
 

Khunter

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I am not a fan of any sort of slow cooking. It ruins wild meat, IMO. Makes it dry, gamey, and funky textured. No amount of sauce will cover nasty meat. I won't eat anything out of a crock-pot or the like, barf...

If I do a pot roast, it starts out marinated, then into in a heavy cast iron pot... hot as hell, and seared on all sides, then finished in the oven for as long as it takes to make medium rare.

This x 100. It ain't rocket surgery. Pay attention, be observant, poke it occasionally as Bambi also said to know how the cooking is proceeding. Although I find marinade not especially 'necessary' to produce great roasts and steaks. Sometimes I do and sometimes I don't use marinade (as in soaking for some extended time). But I do monitor and maintain as needed the moisture level of any wild meat I roast or grill.

Only thing nastier to do to wild meat than a crock pot is pressure cooking. And of course any recipe that starts with "onion soup mix"'and other abominations :eek:

Last night we had antelope shanks for dinner. Clearly a potentially tough chunk of meat. Rpasted in oven covered in a few spices and olive oil. Cooked in 425 degree oven to start so it browned well, then lower heat and covered to retain juices. Poked it now and then to check progress and make sure it was not drying out. Great dinner.
 
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Khunter

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I'm going to mess with sous vide cooking (as soon as I get my machine http://anovaculinary.com/). Looking to do a roast at like 135 degrees for 5-6hrs then finish on the grill to add some char. You get the benefits of slow cooker but medium rare cooked

Cool idea, post results and pics. Had some food at a restaurant recently and saw all sorts of meat sitting in clear tubs, in vacuum bags sitting on the counter. Chatted up the chef and it seems a great process.( at least he was pulling 25 bucks for for a $2 slice of pork tenderloin so it had to be tasty)
 

Lawnboy

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.

Only thing nastier to do to wild meat than a crock pot is pressure cooking. And of course any recipe that starts with "onion soup mix"'and other abominations :eek:

Bunch of haters. Just when I was going to invite you and Bambi over for Sunday dinner ;) :D I crockpot dinners every Sunday and they are my favorite. I will admit that I do not have an ultra refined pallet but I feel like it tastes good. I'll give the grill and foil method a try on my Traeger. Keep the recipes coming.
 

Jamen

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Cube it up into small pieces or strips. Slice some onions and mushrooms toss it all in a little olive oil with some rosemary thyme and sage along with the usual garlic salt pepper. Add it to a hot skillet or frying pan add oil if needed. Let it cook for a few minutes while mixing it up so it does not burn on the bottoms. Now crank the heat to high for a minute or two add some red wine let it do its thing while you are stirring it once that is reduced down add Au Jus for your gravy. Still on high for a few more minutes then turn it down to med and let it reduce to a nice gravy add a few pads of butter and eat as is or over potatoes or noodles or rice. It happens fast so try not to over cook the meat.

Jamen
 

kansasdad

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Not all crockpots are the same.....some are really only good for keeping the nacho cheese warm, others can be quite sophisticated. The method of bringing the desired temperature doesn't really matter too much, what matters most is the correct temperature exposure and moisture infusion/preservation/removal to get to your satisfying final product.
 
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This was fantastic with some corn fed venison, and I'm sure it would be just as awesome with some lope.

Pan-Seared Venison with Rosemary and Dried Cherries

www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Pan-Seared-Venison-with-Rosemary-and-Dried-Cherries-104558

1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary

1 teaspoon coriander seeds

1 large garlic clove

1 1/2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 (1-lb) venison tenderloin

1/4 cup dry red wine

1/4 cup dried tart cherries

3/4 cup fat-free beef broth

1/2 cup water

1 teaspoon cornstarch

2 tablespoons black-currant jelly

Grind 1 teaspoon rosemary with coriander seeds and garlic with a mortar and pestle to make a paste, then stir in 1/2 teaspoon oil.

Pat venison dry and put in a bowl, then rub with paste. Season well with pepper, then cover and chill 20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450°F.

Heat a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet over high heat until hot, then add remaining teaspoon oil, tilting skillet to coat evenly. Season venison well with salt, then brown, turning once, about 6 minutes total.

Transfer skillet to middle of oven and roast venison until an instant-read thermometer inserted diagonally into center registers 125°F, 7 to 10 minutes. Transfer meat to a plate and cover tightly with foil.

Add wine and cherries to skillet and deglaze by boiling over moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits. Stir together broth, water, cornstarch, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon rosemary in a bowl and add to skillet. Simmer, stirring, until mixture is thickened, about 5 minutes. Whisk in jelly and salt and pepper to taste.

Cut venison into 1/4-inch-thick slices and serve with sauce.
 

RobG

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By roast I assume you mean something tough like a shoulder or shank. If it is just a big piece of round or backstrap brown it in bacon grease or vegetable oil and throw it in the oven until medium rare. I suppose you could do a shoulder roast the same way and slice it very thin.

I don't know if this is different enough, but Rinella has a good recipe: http://themeateater.com/videos/a-rinella-recipe-venison-blade-roast/

Cutting shanks into cubes, rolling them in flour, then briefly frying until medium rare is surprisingly good. You could also cut a roast into steaks, pound the hell out of it, and make chicken fried steak.

Chile, venison soup, stew, stir fry, cover in bacon and roast (the drippings help tenderize it)... Google turned up a bunch of off-the-wall recipes I've never tried.

edit, I forgot to add that chokecherry syrup perfectly compliments slow cooked meat. If you don't have that use any sweet jelly/jam.
 
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Bambistew

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Bunch of haters. Just when I was going to invite you and Bambi over for Sunday dinner ;) :D

Ha. I've been known to bring my own steaks to dinner and cook for the host. No one complains. :)

You guys are making me hungry. Been "stationed" in Vancouver for the last two weeks, and really getting tired of eating out. Ready for a good moose, sheep or caribou steak when I get home.
 

1_pointer

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Depends on the size and thickness. I'm not very good at time. Usually just poke it and can feel how done it is. After it's seared, maybe 8-10 min a pound on 400? Medium rare is pretty sqishy, well done is firm to the touch. Can always cut into it and see how done it is.

Wish I had some antelope... Best meat there is.
I plan on shooting 3+ of them next year. I could easily bring one up when you take me caribou hunting... :D
 

JohnCushman

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I started brining roasts. I've done corned and regular ham brined bear, antelope, and elk roasts. I also played with a hot and spicy homemade winging it brine that ended up coming out awesome. I did a ham out of a whole antelope rear quarter. Get a good meat injector. Smoke them on low temps and then wrap them tight in foil and let them rest. You also can't beat a roast just dry rubbed plain with McCormick grill seasoning and covered with bacon and slow cooked in the smoker :D
 
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