Rinella article.. CUT AND PASTED

Nutrioso

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Gilroy, California
I don’t disagree with a lot of what Matt says, and sure see that some of what is posted on social is disrespectful of our game and our traditions, but I think he paints with too broad a brush. Some media outlets promote ethical behaviors and hunting for the right reason and are a positive influence. It can be a great vehicle to train and teach in the absence of mentors. I think Meat Eater is one of those.

I also think social media is not the root of the true problem. There are just too many people trying to enjoy too little resource. That’s true for hunters, fishermen, backpackers and bird watchers. Do we really think there would be fewer vehicles at the trailhead if there was no social media? I am sure there are folks who “do it for the ‘Gram,” but most are just looking to be out there to enjoy what we all enjoy about being outdoors. Ego-driven social media may contribute to the problem, but it’s not like nobody had heard of the Madison River before Facebook.

Matt’s point also overlooks some of the positives of social media, such as the instant bucket brigade launched through various social media outlets on the Madison last week to save fish stranded by the Hebgen Dam failure, or the ability to mobilize a large constituency to support resource conservation issues.

Based on his most recent article and the one he wrote on R3, Matt wishes for what most of us wish for; a return to a time when we had the outdoor paradise to ourselves. I think we could get closer to that goal by expanding opportunities and access rather than trying to stem the growth of interest in our recreation. That genie is well out of the bottle.
 

Jape

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While I agree with many of Matt’s sentiments and frustrations, I also wonder if that position is morally ambiguous. Aren’t there good things that come of sharing our adventures? Isn’t that what inspired many of us to seek hunting adventures in places we had never considered? It must be done the right way, like Randy, but I’m not sure all of Matt’s suggestions will lead to the outcomes he wants.
 

Nate Mode

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Mar 17, 2015
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I don’t disagree with a lot of what Matt says, and sure see that some of what is posted on social is disrespectful of our game and our traditions, but I think he paints with too broad a brush. Some media outlets promote ethical behaviors and hunting for the right reason and are a positive influence. It can be a great vehicle to train and teach in the absence of mentors. I think Meat Eater is one of those.

I also think social media is not the root of the true problem. There are just too many people trying to enjoy too little resource. That’s true for hunters, fishermen, backpackers and bird watchers. Do we really think there would be fewer vehicles at the trailhead if there was no social media? I am sure there are folks who “do it for the ‘Gram,” but most are just looking to be out there to enjoy what we all enjoy about being outdoors. Ego-driven social media may contribute to the problem, but it’s not like nobody had heard of the Madison River before Facebook.

Matt’s point also overlooks some of the positives of social media, such as the instant bucket brigade launched through various social media outlets on the Madison last week to save fish stranded by the Hebgen Dam failure, or the ability to mobilize a large constituency to support resource conservation issues.

Based on his most recent article and the one he wrote on R3, Matt wishes for what most of us wish for; a return to a time when we had the outdoor paradise to ourselves. I think we could get closer to that goal by expanding opportunities and access rather than trying to stem the growth of interest in our recreation. That genie is well out of the bottle.
"Some media outlets promote ethical behaviors and hunting for the right reason and are a positive influence. It can be a great vehicle to train and teach in the absence of mentors. I think Meat Eater is one of those."

Is Meat Eater doing it for the right reason? He's pretty popular on Netflix and seems to be building quite the empire. The dude is smart and saw an opportunity nobody was latching onto with the hunting shows, so he's a good businessman. With that being said, his shows are as retarded to me as that super popular Yellowstone tv show garbage.
 

OntarioHunter

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Sep 11, 2020
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2,797
This site is as deep as I get into social media. Never on Facebook. Outdoors Channel, etc. has no attraction for me. Of late I've been watching a few YouTube videos of African hunting, mostly for the scenery. Takes me back there. Most of the "hunting" is pretty much staged although sometimes there's some genuine stuff. I have never been one to do the whoopup or high five after an animal is down. Job is done and now the work starts. My African lodge owner asked me why I'm not smiling in the photo ops. What's to smile about? A beautiful animal just passed. Give him some respect. Probably be a bunch of folks smiling when I kick off which is okay ... as long as my daughter doesn't see them doing it on Facebook.
 

woods89

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99% of Rokslide is the worst distillation of this — including coordinate selling Robby Denning — so I’m sure that thread’s a peach. Might need to go stir that pot.
I'm actually surprised how much support there is for the article in that thread over there.

I like most of what Matt has to say, but I'm not on the typical social platforms, and I haven't posted any grip and grins that I can recall. I feel quite strongly about this for myself, but I think other people will have to make their own call.

I do really like what he has to say about hunting for ones own fulfillment. Sometimes it's just a lot more rewarding to soak in the moment without having to document it or share it. If other people want to put in the effort they can make their own moments. Having said that, I sure enjoy reading a well written hunting story.
 

SnowyMountaineer

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WY
I'm actually surprised how much support there is for the article in that thread over there.

I like most of what Matt has to say, but I'm not on the typical social platforms, and I haven't posted any grip and grins that I can recall. I feel quite strongly about this for myself, but I think other people will have to make their own call.

I do really like what he has to say about hunting for ones own fulfillment. Sometimes it's just a lot more rewarding to soak in the moment without having to document it or share it. If other people want to put in the effort they can make their own moments. Having said that, I sure enjoy reading a well written hunting story.
I went over and read it and I agree there was more support than expected. I stirred the pot anyway. :)
 

rtraverdavis

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So is Hunt Talk exempt (or at least cushioned) from the pitfalls of posting dead animals like Matt describes? Is there something inherently different about a forum as opposed to other social media? I'm honestly not sure. While HT certainly isn't Facebook or Instagram, it's still social media--available for the world to see.

I wrestled with whether or not to post the story of my hunt this year, which did feature a couple pictures of dead animals. I questioned why I should or should not post it. I decided to go ahead and do it, mostly because I really enjoy reading others' stories and seeing others' photos and wanted to contribute, which to me is the big difference between HT and other social media--I think of this place as an actual community. I have few personal friends who hunt, so HT is my hunting community. I spend a lot of time reading here, and have gotten to know the personalities of many of you who post often. I've learned a great deal about hunting and conservation issues and how to be an advocate for the causes I find important. I've become friends with a few people I've met through the forum. I have plans to hunt with a couple of them next year. I don't have FB or Insta or anything else, but I'd wager that the sense of an actual community is something that is largely missing from those other platforms. The knowing and being known.

But I'd be lying if I said that there wasn't something invigorating about seeing the "likes" roll in on things I post here. It can mess with my addictive personality. There have been times where I've caught myself posting things for laughs or likes, that I probably would not have posted were that not a feature of the forum. I'm bothered by and even disgusted with this trait in myself, but it is inherently human. We all want to be recognized and accepted, to be valued. Social media plays on that, hits us right in the dopamine spot, and can be addicting and lead to people doing lots of stupid shit. I'm not exempt. Personally, if I could I'd take the "like" feature away from the forum, I would, even though I use it all the time.
 

woods89

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In the last Blood Origins podcast with Matt he says he's supposed to be on the Meateater podcast sometime in December. I think Steve is going to have some real questions to wrestle with.
 

woods89

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Messages
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So is Hunt Talk exempt (or at least cushioned) from the pitfalls of posting dead animals like Matt describes? Is there something inherently different about a forum as opposed to other social media? I'm honestly not sure. While HT certainly isn't Facebook or Instagram, it's still social media--available for the world to see.

I wrestled with whether or not to post the story of my hunt this year, which did feature a couple pictures of dead animals. I questioned why I should or should not post it. I decided to go ahead and do it, mostly because I really enjoy reading others' stories and seeing others' photos and wanted to contribute, which to me is the big difference between HT and other social media--I think of this place as an actual community. I have few personal friends who hunt, so HT is my hunting community. I spend a lot of time reading here, and have gotten to know the personalities of many of you who post often. I've learned a great deal about hunting and conservation issues and how to be an advocate for the causes I find important. I've become friends with a few people I've met through the forum. I have plans to hunt with a couple of them next year. I don't have FB or Insta or anything else, but I'd wager that the sense of an actual community is something that is largely missing from those other platforms. The knowing and being known.

But I'd be lying if I said that there wasn't something invigorating about seeing the "likes" roll in on things I post here. It can mess with my addictive personality. There have been times where I've caught myself posting things for laughs or likes, that I probably would not have posted were that not a feature of the forum. I'm bothered by and even disgusted with this trait in myself, but it is inherently human. We all want to be recognized and accepted, to be valued. Social media plays on that, hits us right in the dopamine spot, and can be addicting and lead to people doing lots of stupid shit. I'm not exempt. Personally, if I could I'd take the "like" feature away from the forum, I would, even though I use it all the time.
I personally view forums a bit differently, as they feel a bit more closed, although the same behaviors can manifest themselves on a forum, for sure.
And I use the like button as well, and sometimes wrestle with the same feelings.
 

Hilljackoutlaw

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So is Hunt Talk exempt (or at least cushioned) from the pitfalls of posting dead animals like Matt describes? Is there something inherently different about a forum as opposed to other social media? I'm honestly not sure. While HT certainly isn't Facebook or Instagram, it's still social media--available for the world to see.
I post pics and stories on hunttalk because I feel most on here are like me and genuinely care about the adventure and outcome and brings a smile to their day at lunch or whatever. You guys don't care if it's a world record at the end of a recap or a doe, cow, ewe...but you do care about the adventure and like to read about hunting.
 

morley.tyler

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Jul 28, 2015
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540
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North Idaho, Living in PDX
So is Hunt Talk exempt (or at least cushioned) from the pitfalls of posting dead animals like Matt describes? Is there something inherently different about a forum as opposed to other social media? I'm honestly not sure. While HT certainly isn't Facebook or Instagram, it's still social media--available for the world to see.

I wrestled with whether or not to post the story of my hunt this year, which did feature a couple pictures of dead animals. I questioned why I should or should not post it. I decided to go ahead and do it, mostly because I really enjoy reading others' stories and seeing others' photos and wanted to contribute, which to me is the big difference between HT and other social media--I think of this place as an actual community. I have few personal friends who hunt, so HT is my hunting community. I spend a lot of time reading here, and have gotten to know the personalities of many of you who post often. I've learned a great deal about hunting and conservation issues and how to be an advocate for the causes I find important. I've become friends with a few people I've met through the forum. I have plans to hunt with a couple of them next year. I don't have FB or Insta or anything else, but I'd wager that the sense of an actual community is something that is largely missing from those other platforms. The knowing and being known.

But I'd be lying if I said that there wasn't something invigorating about seeing the "likes" roll in on things I post here. It can mess with my addictive personality. There have been times where I've caught myself posting things for laughs or likes, that I probably would not have posted were that not a feature of the forum. I'm bothered by and even disgusted with this trait in myself, but it is inherently human. We all want to be recognized and accepted, to be valued. Social media plays on that, hits us right in the dopamine spot, and can be addicting and lead to people doing lots of stupid shit. I'm not exempt. Personally, if I could I'd take the "like" feature away from the forum, I would, even though I use it all the time.
The irony of liking this was too much. Sorry.

To engage in your actual question of "So is Hunt Talk exempt (or at least cushioned) from the pitfalls of posting dead animals like Matt describes? Is there something inherently different about a forum as opposed to other social media?", I say this: I look at HuntTalk more like a virtual campfire, or a local coffee shop (The Hoot Owl if you've been to Sandpoint). A bunch of guys hanging around, swapping stories, shooting the shit. asking for and giving advice. Is it a fine line? Sure. I don't see many guys on here puffing their chest, being confrontational, or outright bragging.
I think Matt's article is much more right than wrong, and I appreciate his putting himself out there. Standing on principle can be expensive.
 
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DouglasR

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Jan 9, 2019
Messages
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East central, Il
So is Hunt Talk exempt (or at least cushioned) from the pitfalls of posting dead animals like Matt describes? Is there something inherently different about a forum as opposed to other social media? I'm honestly not sure. While HT certainly isn't Facebook or Instagram, it's still social media--available for the world to see.

I wrestled with whether or not to post the story of my hunt this year, which did feature a couple pictures of dead animals. I questioned why I should or should not post it. I decided to go ahead and do it, mostly because I really enjoy reading others' stories and seeing others' photos and wanted to contribute, which to me is the big difference between HT and other social media--I think of this place as an actual community. I have few personal friends who hunt, so HT is my hunting community. I spend a lot of time reading here, and have gotten to know the personalities of many of you who post often. I've learned a great deal about hunting and conservation issues and how to be an advocate for the causes I find important. I've become friends with a few people I've met through the forum. I have plans to hunt with a couple of them next year. I don't have FB or Insta or anything else, but I'd wager that the sense of an actual community is something that is largely missing from those other platforms. The knowing and being known.

But I'd be lying if I said that there wasn't something invigorating about seeing the "likes" roll in on things I post here. It can mess with my addictive personality. There have been times where I've caught myself posting things for laughs or likes, that I probably would not have posted were that not a feature of the forum. I'm bothered by and even disgusted with this trait in myself, but it is inherently human. We all want to be recognized and accepted, to be valued. Social media plays on that, hits us right in the dopamine spot, and can be addicting and lead to people doing lots of stupid shit. I'm not exempt. Personally, if I could I'd take the "like" feature away from the forum, I would, even though I use it all the time.
I feel like the difference between ht and other forms of social media is that everyone here sought out this website and joined based on a common interest in hunting and a desire to gain and share knowledge on the subject where as Ig and fb are more just like people making websites about themselves.
I agree with whoever the first person was to describe this as a “hunting club”
 

neffa3

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Wenatchee
So is Hunt Talk exempt
No.
It plays on all our greed just like SM does. How many people would post if no one could reply, like, or PM you congrats?
It does however, also play a role in the spreading of information in regard to conservation and the sportsmen lifestyle. That has always been my justification. But it is simply a form of SM that I dislike the least, yet am addicted to.

Great post man.
 

BlazerBeam

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Sep 2, 2020
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Montana
expanding opportunities and access rather than trying to stem the growth of interest in our recreation.
What are you smokin? why do folks not understand that decreased opportunity and access is because of the rapid growth of interest. These are two things working directly opposite of one another.

inspired many of us to seek hunting
Exactly the point. They've inspired too many of you

When you suck at drawing tags, or hunting in general for that matter, I guess you need to find somebody to blame it on.
suck at drawing tags??? how does one suck at that?
 

DouglasR

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Jan 9, 2019
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East central, Il
No.
It plays on all our greed just like SM does. How many people would post if no one could reply, like, or PM you congrats?
It does however, also play a role in the spreading of information in regard to conservation and the sportsmen lifestyle. That has always been my justification. But it is simply a form of SM that I dislike the least, yet am addicted to.

Great post man.
Idk if I’d call it greed.
Picking up a red is just like making someone laugh irl.
I don’t think it’s greedy, it’s enjoying social interaction.
 

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