Non-resident outfitter license (MT) Bill is up for hearing 2/2/2021 (SB 143)

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Big Shooter

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Too funny welfare ranchers and outfitters, complaining about average joes on welfare. Wow.

Its everywhere. Ive been working 60 to 72 hr weeks plus 2 hrs drive time everyday. They starting people at $23 hr and still nobody applys.
Really?? Your ignorance amazes me!
 

Big Shooter

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In gallatin county there is more work for anybody willing to work than I’ve ever seen. Yet places can’t find help. Both my kids are making 20-25 hr. Fast food restaurants can’t find help at those wages. Crazy times.
Disturbing times!
 

FoodIsMemories

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In gallatin county there is more work for anybody willing to work than I’ve ever seen. Yet places can’t find help. Both my kids are making 20-25 hr. Fast food restaurants can’t find help at those wages. Crazy times.
He ain’t lying. EVERYwhere is hiring for more money at no experience than I’ve ever seen.
 

406dn

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What's a good wage? I would say it is a wage that attracts the level of productivity a business needs. For many years, employers have enjoyed a labor pool that left quite a few talented and industrious people under employed. I think that day has passed.

I do not understand how any employer can expect to hire a dependable, productive employee at a wage that won't support the employee with decent housing, a decent car and a modest amount of discretionary income that would support an interest outside of work.

If the wage doesn't support that, the only person with any interest in the job, will be some one living day to day. They will take and leave jobs the same way. Or a dependable person in a tough spot, they might use that sort of job as a bridge, while they continue to look for a better job. They will leave soon enough as well.

I do not feel sorry for low wage employers in their present plight in attracting workers. Just as the world does not owe anyone a living, it does not owe employers a ready supply of workers willing to work for low wages.
 

Eric Albus

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A business not being able to get employees because they’re underpaying compared to their competition is one thing.
a business not being able to get employees because their tax dollars are being redistributed to pay able bodied people not to work is another.

I have more jobs and work than I have time for. I can’t fathom how others don’t have the same problem.
This
 

Eric Albus

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The direction this country is headed in right now we may see the day people will be willing to go to work for a load of bread. It happened before, and it can happen again.
It wouldn’t hurt my feelings to see some of the “woke” crowd receive an awakening.
 

Gerald Martin

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What's a good wage? I would say it is a wage that attracts the level of productivity a business needs. For many years, employers have enjoyed a labor pool that left quite a few talented and industrious people under employed. I think that day has passed.

I do not understand how any employer can expect to hire a dependable, productive employee at a wage that won't support the employee with decent housing, a decent car and a modest amount of discretionary income that would support an interest outside of work.

If the wage doesn't support that, the only person with any interest in the job, will be some one living day to day. They will take and leave jobs the same way. Or a dependable person in a tough spot, they might use that sort of job as a bridge, while they continue to look for a better job. They will leave soon enough as well.

I do not feel sorry for low wage employers in their present plight in attracting workers. Just as the world does not owe anyone a living, it does not owe employers a ready supply of workers willing to work for low wages.
I agree that the world doesn’t owe employers a ready supply of workers. But how does a worker go from no skill/experience to a higher wage without entry level experience and pay?

Entry level jobs are inevitably transitory in nature but often lead to permanent high paying work.

I always looked at working as a non negotiable necessity for survival, not an elective to be done at my convenience. In an environment that favors workers it’s definitely nice to have a desirable skill set and work ethic that allows me to negotiate a situation that is more lucrative and flexible than when times are tough, but not working because I have a government check in hand never comes to my mind.

As Greenhorn mentioned, a motivated person in Gallatin County has as much opportunity to work as he can desire. The cost of housing doesn’t make it feasible to move here simply for high wages, but for someone who already owns a home or has a stable rent situation it’s boom time.
 

Gerald Martin

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The direction this country is headed in right now we may see the day people will be willing to go to work for a load of bread. It happened before, and it can happen again.
It wouldn’t hurt my feelings to see some of the “woke” crowd receive an awakening.
The problem is that it will probably hit the “woke” areas after rural and agricultural regions.
Many family farmers and ag producers are motivated as much by the way of life as they are by profits. But, at some point when there’s no profit not even a desirable lifestyle is enough to keep them on the farm.
 

Greenhorn

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land of smallish to average rams
As Greenhorn mentioned, a motivated person in Gallatin County has as much opportunity to work as he can desire. The cost of housing doesn’t make it feasible to move here simply for high wages, but for someone who already owns a home or has a stable rent situation it’s boom time.
Boom time? 🙂 until you decide to move and /or sell your home and have to give half your life earned equity to Uncle Sam, after Biden’s tax plan goes in.

my son made $200 in 30 minutes photographing some kid today. There’s a lot of money here..

bye - have some rams to say hello to.
 

406dn

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The direction this country is headed in right now we may see the day people will be willing to go to work for a load of bread. It happened before, and it can happen again.
It wouldn’t hurt my feelings to see some of the “woke” crowd receive an awakening.
Then you can't really expect them to worry about the price of cattle, hay, drought, whatever. Maybe, like you, they will say too bad, so sad, he needed an awakening.
 

SAJ-99

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The direction this country is headed in right now we may see the day people will be willing to go to work for a load of bread. It happened before, and it can happen again.
It wouldn’t hurt my feelings to see some of the “woke” crowd receive an awakening.
The cattle industry has yet to receive theirs. Four companies process 85-90% of all the cattle, and set the price. The individual rancher has little say in it other than to sell or keep and feed. While their customers got larger and more powerful, the ranchers complained about APR, democrats, taxes, and regulation. Encouraged by the people they vote for to incorrectly place that blame. All is well as long as you distracted from what is really going on. The largest ranches continue to grow so they have pull in pricing.

you can fight change all you want, but it will happen anyway. Read about the native Americans.
 

Eric Albus

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I don’t expect them to feel bad and I certainly don’t expect they should know anything about commodity prices.
They will get an awakening very soon at the grocery store, just like I will when food prices skyrocket on account of inflation and drought related shortages.
 

Eric Albus

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The cattle industry has yet to receive theirs. Four companies process 85-90% of all the cattle, and set the price. The individual rancher has little say in it other than to sell or keep and feed. While their customers got larger and more powerful, the ranchers complained about APR, democrats, taxes, and regulation. Encouraged by the people they vote for to incorrectly place that blame. All is well as long as you distracted from what is really going on. The largest ranches continue to grow so they have pull in pricing.

you can fight change all you want, but it will happen anyway. Read about the native
I am able to understand of your post, you are correct in that the packers control production and consumption with price fixing, their profits are off the charts. They have paid off Congress and have a free pass on their monopoly.
Liberals are like a cancer to the farm/ranch community, so correct we have little use for them.
Unfortunately the largest farms/ranches do have to grow, just like any business that operates on a 2-4% profit margins, volume is how you survive. It’s cheaper for an outfit to run 10,000 cows, or farm 100,000 acres than it is for a small operation like ours.
I look at myself and my neighbors and tell them, we are the last Indians. I hope we get a monthly stipend when we’re rounded up and run out of business.
 

Eric Albus

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The cattle industry has yet to receive theirs. Four companies process 85-90% of all the cattle, and set the price. The individual rancher has little say in it other than to sell or keep and feed. While their customers got larger and more powerful, the ranchers complained about APR, democrats, taxes, and regulation. Encouraged by the people they vote for to incorrectly place that blame. All is well as long as you distracted from what is really going on. The largest ranches continue to grow so they have pull in pricing.

you can fight change all you want, but it will happen anyway. Read about the native
What I am able to understand of your post, you are correct in that the packers control production and consumption with price fixing, their profits are off the charts. They have paid off Congress and have a free pass on their monopoly.
Liberals are like a cancer to the farm/ranch community, so correct we have little use for them.
Unfortunately the largest farms/ranches do have to grow, just like any business that operates on a 2-4% profit margins, volume is how you survive. It’s cheaper for an outfit to run 10,000 cows, or farm 100,000 acres than it is for a small operation like ours.
I look at myself and my neighbors and tell them, we are last Indians. I hope we get a monthly stipend when we’re rounded up and run out of business.
 

Eric Albus

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992
Somewhere between the extreme edges of comparison is the truth.

I have no doubts that all the stimulus money has contributed to some workers choosing to stay home rather than work. Not everyone works with a mentality of advancing themselves financially and materially over the long term.

My family is part of a turkey growing cooperative. Their processing plants are running at @ 60% of pre-COVID employees in spite of raises and monthly bonuses for workers who don’t miss work days. They aren’t losing workers to businesses paying more than they are.
Other businesses in the area are having the same struggle to retain low skilled workers.

The simple answer isn’t as simple as “pay a liveable wage…” What number is that?
Will consumers pay enough for the product a company produces to support increases or will they buy less and in the end workers get layed off because demand decreases?

There’s always going to be tension between production and consumption. Introducing trillions of “magic money” into that equation isn’t sustainable or helpful for stabilizing markets and labor demands.
Any idea as to who will be paying the piper for the trillions of dollars printed? The hole our government is digging is a bad thing. When the recession/depression comes it will be bad.

Any idea of how much a trillion is? To put in perspective 1 million seconds is about 6 days, 1 billion seconds about 36 yrs. One trillion seconds is about 36,000 years. I cannot get my head around a trillion.
 
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