Neck tensioning sequence

Bigjay73

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I am in the minority, but I have never seen a difference in annealed brass vs no annealed brass as far as accuracy goes. I don't keep brass past 10 firings though, so I don't worry about weakening the brass.
 

Mthuntr

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I am in the minority, but I have never seen a difference in annealed brass vs no annealed brass as far as accuracy goes. I don't keep brass past 10 firings though, so I don't worry about weakening the brass.
I'm of the group that if you don't anneal at the beginning and every firing then it's not worth doing at all. I don't have evidence to back this up but to me doing it once or twice in the life of the brass doesn't seem to do anything for neck tension, brass life, etc. I currently do not anneal but as I switch to higher quality brass I am going to start.
 

cahunter805

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Is not a bushing die the best way to get consistent neck tension when sizing? Help me understand..
The best way to achieve consistent neck tension is to neck turn the brass with a carbide cutter mandrel that also cuts the inside neck as well to eliminate any donut that might be present. Then size the brass down and set the desired diameter with the correct size mandrel. It’s more consistent due to less spring back and most mandrels are available in .0005.

A bushing die works well also though and is quicker but still benefits from neck turned brass as well.
The reason for neck turning brass is to eliminate inconsistent neck thickness which when you size your brass is transferred to the inside of the case neck and makes uneven pressure on the bullet.
 

Caseknife

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I've been reloading for about 40 years and have only had neck tension issues with loads for a buddies '06. In all reality no idea how many times the cases had been loaded. Just started annealing last year when I purchased an AnnealEze, fun to anneal all the brass in my inventory. Have never neck turned brass, never felt the need to get that in depth in reloading when with a little load development, I can usually get a rifle to group less than an inch at a hundred yards which is plenty good for any hunting I do. If I screw up a shot, pretty sure that it is me and not the rifle. Pretty much neck size only for specific rifles. I don't worry if the bolt is a little stiff to close, not into dangerous game and most of my shots are less than 100 yards. One of the kind of bad habits that I have developed is to not cycle the bolt with gusto when shooting at an animal, but to catch the spent case and put it in my pocket. Can sometimes lead to a bloody pinky finger when it gets caught by the bolt lug and shears a bit of flesh off:(
 

Redmt

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I must be doing it wrong. I decap, tumble pin clean in 2 steps. I do like the idea of sizing dirty brass. Next I size usually with a FL die, trim if necessary for OA case dimensions. I prime in another step then load. I do prefer to use a Lee factory neck die for neck tension in all calibers. At my level of shooting ability and quality of rifles I point and shoot and something falls down. You can't eat a target.
 

Redmt

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Most bushing dies set a more consistent outside neck diameter, while mandrels set a more consistent inside neck diameter.
It may have been an anomaly, but we ordered a neck bushing die from one of the major die makers and it was oval shaped by .002 Customer service wasn't much help. One the other hand, I have had wonky dies from another mfg. I've pretty much centered up on all RCBS dies for everything.
 

cahunter805

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It may have been an anomaly, but we ordered a neck bushing die from one of the major die makers and it was oval shaped by .002 Customer service wasn't much help. One the other hand, I have had wonky dies from another mfg. I've pretty much centered up on all RCBS dies for everything.
RCBS dies have been the worst for me. One neck die had such bad runout not sure how it made it out of the factory. They did replace it though.
Redding is my go to for most dies these days.
 

Redmt

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RCBS dies have been the worst for me. One neck die had such bad runout not sure how it made it out of the factory. They did replace it though.
Redding is my go to for most dies these days.
I'm going to bet that no matter what brand there's going to be a couple bad ones in the batch. Quality control across the board needs to improve.
 

std7mag

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The only issue i've encountered with neck tension is my 284 Win with RCBS dies.
Both the F/L & neck sizing dies turned it into a 270-284. :oops:

I happened to notice when i was setting seating depth on a bullet i hadn't loaded for previously. Large bulge where the bullet was resizing the neck.
I popped for a Forester F/L die, which in reality wasn't that badly priced. $48. And took care of the issue, so well worth the money.

I don't turn the outside of the neck, but rather size without the expander, then inside neck ream.
 
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