Caribou Gear Tarp

Last Minute Bow- Tuning and Relief

R.K.

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
539
Location
MT
Due to unforeseen circumstances, I had a part wear out on my bow this year, can't get a replacement, and found myself without a working bow only 2 months away from the archery elk opener. Hit up the local bow shop, searched classified ads, and eventually came across a BowTech Reign 7 that checked all my boxes for a reasonable price.

Swapped over the sight and stabilizer, set the draw length and draw stops, got a new rest (old will be a backup), got the peep height set, and hit the range. Luckily, it's the same same draw weight and length as my old bow, so I was good to go on arrows.

It took a minute to get my grip right on this bow, and I struggled shooting decent groups the first couple times out, making bareshaft tuning difficult. Once I got that figured out and got the bare shaft hitting with field points, I switched over to broadheads at 10 yards, then 20, 30, etc. Move the rest to bring the broadheads towards the field points, move back in to 10 yards, take a couple shots with field points to sight in again (unnecessary if I had a big enough broadhead target, which I didn't), then shoot a broad head followed by a few field points. Repeat until desired results achieved.

This photo is one broadhead and two field points at 45 yards from earlier tonight. Other groups were almost as good. I think the bow is ready.


PXL_20210831_011636576.jpg

The block obviously moved with each shot, so don't read into arrow angle too much. Largest group at 60 yards was 5". If you look closely, I also kinda busted an arrow shooting that group in the photo above. It's a good confidence booster, but not entirely helpful.

Finished honing & stropping a brand new pack of NAP Thunderhead 125s to match with the set of arrows that are flying better out of the bow- used an exacto knife handle to hold them, and got them push-cut sharp with green and white honing compounds. Takes a minute to adjust them to perfect spin on the arrows, but I usually get them dead nuts on by rotating the collar a bit and retightening.

It's a definite relief having everything set up and shooting well. Now all I have to do is find an elk. Good luck to everybody headed out, and hope to see some photos!
 
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John Galt

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Joined
Aug 30, 2021
Messages
23
Location
Wyoming
A couple years ago I had to get rid of my Pearson bushmaster compound that I bought nearly 20 years ago because the limbs were starting to delaminate. I took a bunch of deer with that thing and could group arrows like yours. Now, I have a Diamond Edge SB-1 bow and cant for the life of me get tight groupings. I miss that old bow...
 

R.K.

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
539
Location
MT
A couple years ago I had to get rid of my Pearson bushmaster compound that I bought nearly 20 years ago because the limbs were starting to delaminate. I took a bunch of deer with that thing and could group arrows like yours. Now, I have a Diamond Edge SB-1 bow and cant for the life of me get tight groupings. I miss that old bow...
Sounds like you need to go shoot a bunch of bows and see what you can find that fits you. Not sure what your opportunity to do that is like, but that's my recommendation.
 

WestKyHunt

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Joined
Feb 24, 2020
Messages
636
Location
COS
A couple years ago I had to get rid of my Pearson bushmaster compound that I bought nearly 20 years ago because the limbs were starting to delaminate. I took a bunch of deer with that thing and could group arrows like yours. Now, I have a Diamond Edge SB-1 bow and cant for the life of me get tight groupings. I miss that old bow...
I have a diamond infinite edge and can only group good enough to feel comfortable hunting at 25yd.
What's your draw length and poundage?
 

R.K.

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
539
Location
MT
I have a diamond infinite edge and can only group good enough to feel comfortable hunting at 25yd.
What's your draw length and poundage?

Draw 29.5", 69#. Stand right about 6'2" and 180lb.

Best advice I can give is what was shared with me via archerytalk- it's to work on your form:

1. Grip, first and foremost- have to figure out how to hold the bow torque free, or it will completely throw off everything you do. Look around online to try figuring out the best method, and figure out something that anchors in solid with no torque. Usually this means your first two knuckles are out of 45° angle, and the grip is resting on the lifeline of your palm, or slightly towards your thumb.

2. Work on your "T-form". It's a way to consistently hold the bow at full draw with minimal effort and minimal movement. My groups shrunk by about half after I worked on this. Need to have an arrow level on the bow, then shoulders level, front arm straight out and level (But elbow slightly rotated/bent away from the string), etc. The goal here is get your bones aligned, and the force going straight down your skeletal structure so there's no rotation or torque introduced, and minimal muscle effort. Most folks' tendency is to shoot too long of a draw length, drop their front shoulder, and wind up fighting the bow instead of working with it. You should have your head and spine upright, from skull to floor. No side lean, no slouch, no head lean. Straight line, from head to heels.

3. Then adjust your draw length as needed, either quarter inch or half inch at a time. Proper draw length might feel a little short initially, but it's better to shoot the shorter draw length that fits than a longer draw length that doesn't. Goal is to have your head upright when you're fully anchored, front arm straight and level, shoulders level, etc.

4. Only then should you add a peep sight and sight pins to the bow. Add the site to the bow, then draw and anchor, and mark where the peep sight needs to go. Remember to keep your head upright and locked at full draw.
 
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