Javelina boar #2.

Tom

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I saw two sunday am, real early down it the bottom where its thick. They moved into some brush. I didn't see them again for about 30-40 min. but was looking down there pretty regularly wondering where they went and if I would get a shot. This one was moving through about a 10 foot clearing on some rocks. I shattered a rock right next to him with the first shot. He was shocked, having a rock break apart right next to him and probably pieces hit him. It made him pause and the second shot went through his shoulder and out the neck on the other side.

Just doe/spike whitetail season left here now, and quail, those are good besides waterfowl, that season is still going too. We get two javelina per year and I got two this year where I"ve been hunting. I've heard they are closely related to the guinea pig. They don't stink that bad to a pretty sinky guy like me at least, although some people call them a stink pig.

I'm getting some more javelina sausage made.
 

Calif. Hunter

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Did you dress it out yourself? I've heard the meat can be good if you avoid the glands on the back. Are there two glands - one by sholders and one on the hips?

Nice little piggy.
 

Tom

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Cali,

I stay clear of those glands, I have never popped one seeing where exactly it comes out. It sounds like you have, knowing there are two of them? Are there? I know there's at least one on tap behind the shoulder. Here's some info. on the scent of those stink pigs.

"Peccary Perfume
Usually hidden beneath the bristly hairs near the rear of a javelina’s back is a small organ producing an oily liquid with a strong and unmistakable odor. This musky perfume helps maintain order in the busy javelina social life.

Javelina, or collared peccary
Javelina usually stay with the same herds throughout their lives, traveling, feeding, bedding down, even playing together. From time to time pairs of animals stand nose-to-tail and rub their heads across each other’s scent glands. As a result of this frequent contact, every javelina herd develops its own distinctive group scent.

Javelina sniff each other to recognize their herd-mates. As the herd moves through the desert it’s enveloped by its communal smell, helping members to stay in contact with the group. (They also listen for the sounds of the other animals’ grunting, chewing, and moving about.)

Odor also helps keep different herds apart. Herds mark the boundaries of their territories by rubbing scent glands across rocks and trees.

— David W. Lazaroff,
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Book of Answers (ASDM Press, 1998)."

I smelled them the day before but didn't see them. Its pretty thick in the bottom where they were. I have a friend that just skins them and takes the meat off the outside. I don't mind gutting them as the meat cools off then and they are easier to carry out. I stay clear of the top from shoulder to rump, not wanting to squeeze the scent out, some people know right where to cut the gland out. It was warm here yesterday, so I just dropped the gutted javelina off at a meat processor at the first big town, Del Rio, TX on the way back home. They grunt a lot to stay in contact also, I've noticed that. I've heard them several times without seeing them right away.
 

Calif. Hunter

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No, Tom, I've never gotten one. We went hunting them in Arizona one time, but only saw Coues deer and desert mule deer - naturally, if we were hunting deer, all we would have seen would be javelina.
I have just heard about the glands, and wanted to know how you dealt with them. Cut them out? Cut around them? Ignore them and let the butcher deal with them?


From what you say, it looks like there is only one of them, near the hips.
 

Tom

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Well, I either skin them off with the skin just like skinning a deer and avoid getting sprayed by sqeezing one as I skin it, or I take the gutted animal in and let someone else worry about it. This year, there was a meat processor on the way, so I did that. In the past I've skinned them like a deer and been fine. I've seen others cut the gland out when they gut them, so as not to worry about it later. Others here, will have something to say on it too when they read this.
 

KC

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Tom:

Congratulations on another successful hunt. Looks like the Pecos River Hunt Club is doing well. Those pictures sure look inviting right now. Last night the temp was -5° here.

KC
 
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