Sitka Gear

He bit the hand that feeds him. 🤬

elkduds

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Jan 22, 2016
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CO Springs.
He'd already be in the ground if he was mine. I'm zero tolerance for biting.. No excuses.. Just the liability aspect of a dog who has bitten is enough for me to not want it. Being that he is a known bite risk if he bit anyone else you would be in deep dodo knowing before hand..

Not to mention dogs are not people. If he will bite you when threatened and you say he's bonded to you what would stop him from biting a stranger..

I'm pretty sure I will catch flack for this but I've seen dogs do some pretty terrible things to kids. Of course the owners made excuses but almost every time when all things were revealed it came out that the dog had bitten people before..

I'm not going to say I'm sorry for how I stand on this one. Put it down..
Contact a GSP-specific rescue group. Do not kill a dog for being a dog, without giving it the grace of having a chance at a better situation. The last 2 Vizslas we fostered were surrendered to our rescue for aggression (biting). Both had some behavioral work to do in foster care, which took 2-3 months as only dogs in the house. Both are now with owners who understand them, dogs and new owners are living the dream together.

Almost without exception, dogs aren't the problem, people are. Fullquiver, fish make good pets for people that don't understand dogs. Dogs that "do some pretty terrible things to kids" were made that way by the 'humans' that were supposed to care for them.
 
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BucksnDucks

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Northern CA
or a dog with a clean track record and no signs of aggression for 6 years then to two incidents in a month. Both revolving around a new puppy and chewing things. It’s not so easy of a decision
Sounds like he is getting another chance. One thing you've got going is the hunting season, I've found tired dogs are good dogs. So get out and work him on birds.

As far as the biting and aggression I personally haven't dealt with a real bite, just growling or posturing. In those situations I immediately dominated the dog. Some may not agree but I would snatch the dog by the collar or scruff, put on the ground and hold or lay on them until they submit. I've seen some guys bite an ear or even growl while doing this. If the dog really fights back or tries to bite I think you've got big problems. In my experience they briefly fuss, then relent. I then generally go into some real basic training like sit stay come and if all is well end with something positive like fetch. Good luck, just like people not all dogs are the same.
 

Hunting Wife

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Almost North Dakota, not quite Canada
I understand the tough position you are in now. I would not want to be in that position ever with a dog I had shared some years with.

However, the dog can never think it dominates any person, especially the children. I am afraid you could be in for much bigger problems down the road without some major correction. If you are intent on keeping the dog, it would be in both of your best interest to consult a professional trainer.
 

MTLabrador

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Man that’s a tough situation that I hope I never experience. I’m far from a dog training expert but I agree that a professional trainer is probably the way to go if you keep him.
 

Fullquiver

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Contact a GSP-specific rescue group. Do not kill a dog for being a dog, without giving it the grace of having a chance at a better situation. The last 2 Vizslas we fostered were surrendered to our rescue for aggression (biting). Both had some behavioral work to do in foster care, which took 2-3 months as only dogs in the house. Both are now with owners who understand them, dogs and new owners are living the dream together.

Almost without exception, dogs aren't the problem, people are. Fullquiver, fish make good pets for people that don't understand dogs. Dogs that "do some pretty terrible things to kids" were made that way by the 'humans' that were supposed to care for them.
I wouldn't necessarily disagree with most of what you stated. However there are dogs that aren't worth the risk in my estimation.. Just looking at liability alone makes it very difficult to have a dog with a known history of biting around. Like do you like having a house kind of liability.. Some of the largest awards not involving death I have seen personally were from dog bites.

I've had dogs my whole life and trained more than a few coon and cat dogs. I've also worked with coyote dogs. I understand why dogs bite but I have boundaries also, unfortunately too many people spoil their dogs and treat them like equals or even above people. This is generally a recipe for these kind of situations. The worst dog bite I have personally seen was from a spoiled cocker spaniel that was never disciplined only treated like a child. It had bitten several times. Then it ripped the eye out and a large part of the face loose from an 8 year old girl before it was stopped. She just wanted to play with the dog and the dog thought it was the dominant part of the pack.. All the little girl did was pick up the toy and get down to the level of the dog..

BTW I knew the owners of the dog and I will guarantee you that dog was never abused nor neglected. Just spoiled..

That girl never got her eye back and is scarred for the rest of her life.. The owners lost their home in the deal as the judgement was well above their insurance liability and because no other insurance wanted to insure them..

You're right a lot of people shouldn't have dogs maybe not even fish.
 

Jonesy125

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Jul 1, 2013
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Montana
When my youngest hunting dog was a pup he grabbed something he wasn’t supposed to have and ran into his crate, I reached in to take it away and he bit me actually drew blood. I was fired up, wife talked me off the edge or I would have ended it right there. He is the youngest of 3 labs and we were working with a very good hunt test trainer when this happened. I called him and he basically said it was my fault I reached into his safe space while threatening him and he had no option for flight, only fight. He is 5 now and is my 4 year old and one year old boys best friend. Been in your shoes but it took someone explaining what happened to me to realize I didn’t have an aggressive dog, I had a dog I put in a situation that I shouldn’t have.
 

neffa3

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Apr 17, 2015
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Wenatchee
So I have a mentally unstable GSP that had two incidents with biting people earlyon. After the 1st with my niece I almost shot her on the spot, but was gunless. After the second involving my Mom, a seasoned dog trainer, I said she had to go.

However, my wife being the one of better judgment and even keel, eventually convinced me both situations were not entirely the dog's fault. We eventually had everyone in our family work on obedience training with her and we also recognized our dogs limitations and planned around those accordingly.

We've since been incident free and fairly happy with her.
 

2ski

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Mar 3, 2015
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Bozeman...Seeley when I can be there.
I appreciate your comments. I just don’t know what more we could of done to try and correct it. Tonight is just a lot of emotion on both sides of the collar.
Consult/hire a dog trainer. They know more than us. And they can read body language better. Not some petco trainer. But someone that their business is training.

Also, little dog allowed on furnature but gsp not? What are things little dog is allowed to do that the gsp can't? You may need to talk to your wife about treating her dog as a dog.
 

Addicting

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Consult/hire a dog trainer. They know more than us. And they can read body language better. Not some petco trainer. But someone that their business is training.

Also, little dog allowed on furnature but gsp not? What are things little dog is allowed to do that the gsp can't? You may need to talk to your wife about treating her dog as a dog.

We talked about this last night and equal treatment. Wife got mad at me when I pointed out that she created a lot of this. Dogs lifestyle went from this:
018B65F4-1285-48AC-9482-31F7D267D653.jpeg

To a constant state of his ankles getting nipped at, toy stealing, and the damn yip yap on her lap. While he gets told “that’s not yours” 50 times a day. In hindsight I would be really cranky too if my wife moved in a younger stud and made me watch them interact all day long.
 

OntarioHunter

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Sep 11, 2020
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The "watch out when in their space" mentioned above is spot on. I've never been bit by any of my Labs but I can think of three that showed their teeth when I tried to haul them out of their space to give them hell for chewing stuff up. I can get pretty intense.

Keep reminding the dog all day what he did wrong. Mine know what I'm talking about when I say "chewed it up" or "hole in the yard". I guarantee they don't forget. My Lab Ellie remembers the exact spot where she dropped her first rooster and it ran off. Every time we go to Bernie's place in Montana, she swims the creek to look for it. That was four years ago. When they've done something wrong they think they are helping you forget by acting like they have. Give him reminders.
 

JLS

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Almost Arkansas…..

David58

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Oct 13, 2020
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Northern NM
You're deep in the process now, but when we acquired our last pup, a Rat Terrier, we took concrete steps to make sure he knew he was LAST on the totem pole of the pack. He eats last, gets his leash last, etc., as the smaller terriers can be biters and can attempt to run the house. Even if he'd be a short appetizer for one of the Airedales.

Our previous RT was a rescue, and he was broken when we got him. Loyal to family, but bit strangers or non-family visitors. Nothing we tried, working with trainers and our vet, worked. Except when he showed his teeth, he was a wonderdog.

It is best to avoid amped-up situations, so when you reach into the crate (WHICH YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO DO WITHOUT BEING BITTEN) it is a friend's hand, and not a threat. We made sure there is no growling about food bowls, "invading" the crate, etc. because that is what a kid will do.

AND....since the RT gets to sit on the sofa, the 90# Airedales get to as well. My expensive, leather sofa, dangit.
 

Sytes

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Montana
My best dog, first hound - Around 8 y/o, reached a point where he became very aggressive. Similar to what you shared.

Thought I was going to have to put him down as it elevated. Very strange and concerning!

Contacted my friend's vet buddy. Took him to his house that night, basically noosed with my buddy and kept opposite leashes to get him in the back of the truck. It was close to the point - I was going to put him down right there! Really a tough gig!

Shuddering sadness! We spoke a bit and the vet injected him to mellow him out. Once 15 minutes passed vet nutted him right there.

Came back to normal the next day. He said the whatever built up and...

Best dog ever!

edited: Darn phone - phone flips words. hah!
 
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wolfpup

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Jul 14, 2015
Messages
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Get rid of the lap dog your wife got. I understand that's tough but the GSP was there first. The small dog does exactly what small dogs do as pups. The pup needs obedience training and the GSP needs space. I definitely understand not wanting your kid bit as no parent ever does, but when a dog bites it out of defense or invasion of personal space. I remember when I got bit as a kid I took the dogs bone because I wanted her to play with me instead so she bit me. Learned my lesson! Now with a 1 year old that's a different story but my bet is the small dog will more likely bite the kid or whoever sooner than the GSP, but that's just my opinion. Sounds like the GSP is just acting out when it gets a new sibling. Wait until you have your second kid and see if you have the same symptoms in your children. Both are easy to assert dominance and correct!
 

Addicting

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Get rid of the lap dog your wife got. I understand that's tough but the GSP was there first. The small dog does exactly what small dogs do as pups. The pup needs obedience training and the GSP needs space. I definitely understand not wanting your kid bit as no parent ever does, but when a dog bites it out of defense or invasion of personal space. I remember when I got bit as a kid I took the dogs bone because I wanted her to play with me instead so she bit me. Learned my lesson! Now with a 1 year old that's a different story but my bet is the small dog will more likely bite the kid or whoever sooner than the GSP, but that's just my opinion. Sounds like the GSP is just acting out when it gets a new sibling. Wait until you have your second kid and see if you have the same symptoms in your children. Both are easy to assert dominance and correct!
We have two kids and lived thru it. I wish I could get rid of the Yip Yap but it would likely cause a divorce. She has been lusting over this dog for years and with it finally here there is no getting rid of it.

I’ve told her that he was here first and he has seniority before we even got the pup. She says understands but the reality is that fuzz butt gets away with pretty much everything. I really don’t like that dog.
 

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