Yeti

Gear list for 1st season backpack elk hunt

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Dec 10, 2019
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I am planning a backpacking elk hunt next year, Colorado 1st rifle at around 10,000-11,000 feet. Will have a wall tent at the truck, spike camp deeper in. Will be splitting tent, stove, fuel weight with a buddy. Will be going in and scouting for 4-5 days before season opens. Been getting together gear, have most of it, except clothing and food, before I finish, was hoping I could get some input from you guys that have done backpack hunts before. Am I way off on weight and gear? Are there items on the list that I really don’t need to bring, or should leave at the truck? Too much weight or missing essential gear? Thanks in advance, this will be my first trip out west.
 
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rustednuts

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Apr 7, 2018
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I'd go with a smaller fuel canister and 1 pair of underwear. I'd drop the poncho if you already have rain gear. The pullover and midlayer top seem redundant.
 
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Smaller fuel canister, even for 2 people? I’m testing out how many liters I can boil on a canister, I honestly have no idea, I had never used one before a few weeks ago.
 

nrpate05

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Jan 5, 2015
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I'd swap the Kiln boxers/base layer for something lighter. The weather can be quite warm in October. You probably also don't need the ridgeline pullover if you have a raincoat. I'd swap that out for a synthetic or fleece vest. One last thing, I'd bring a water bottle (I like Nalgene) in addition to the platypus. If that thing bursts, you're hosed!
 

TOGIE

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Dec 13, 2017
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i don't see the need for a klamath hoody and a ridgeline pullover, to me that's like bringing two mid layers. bring one of everything clothing wise, except socks. if you have a clothing emergency get back to base camp and fix it. i personally gave up on longjohns in favor of puffy pants. most often hiking around during the day during first rifle is a hot sweaty affair and long johns are a PIA. puffy pants make up for not having a zero degree bag too.

only bring gaiters if it's going to be super snowy in the forecast, not a ton of need for those unless you're hiking around in like more than 5 inches of snow IMO

there are much lighter tents out there and much lighter sleeping bags - tent not a big deal since you will split that, but you could realistically cut that weight in half. i carry a 30 oz 10 degree bag which has served me fine during 1st rifle. my large neo air x pad only weighs 16 oz too.

i double on gloves myself if it's gonna be a rather cold forecast. lighter gloves are my sitka mountain gloves and the heavier gloves for cold ass glassing are my snowboarding mittens or these Head gloves i'm trying out from costco

a lot of that costs some not insignificant $$. but food for thought, especially if you're gonna start hunting out west out of a backpack more often.
 

cahunter805

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May 27, 2014
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Just a thought. I noticed you listed 30 peak meals? How many do you plan on eating a day? Normally I’ll take a few peak breakfast meals but usually just eat a bar or 2 instead. I always eat a meal for dinner though.
 
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Just a thought. I noticed you listed 30 peak meals? How many do you plan on eating a day? Normally I’ll take a few peak breakfast meals but usually just eat a bar or 2 instead. I always eat a meal for dinner though.
I haven’t decided on food completely, so I just figured 3 a day. Breakfast is never a meal I will skip, if anything maybe a bar or something for lunch.
 

JAG

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Mar 2, 2020
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I'd go with a smaller fuel canister and 1 pair of underwear. I'd drop the poncho if you already have rain gear. The pullover and midlayer top seem redundant.
I'm having an immature chuckle at the poster name and his suggestion for only 1 pair of underwear. I haven't tried just one pair yet. I like having a 2nd pair to wash/dry for smells and/or chafing.

That's a very impressive list. I'm curious to know from others if you trust a base layer and mid-layer under a breathable rain shell to eliminate the need for a puffy vest? Dry winter weather is so much easier to dress for than the humid cold air in the deep south.

Some people like having an extra pair of camp shoes (like crocs) if they have heavy boots. I love my trail runners in Summer to 1st Rifle because they dry out fast and I only carry that one pair. Even your best Gore-tex boots will get wet from sweat or water. Getting them dried out can be such a chore that sometimes just doesn't happen.

I did not see Trekking Poles on the list. This is a major weight redistribution tool that places weight and resulting fatigue away from your ankles and knees to your arms. Ozark Trail Walmart poles can be had for $20. They are adjustable, very sturdy and plenty light-weight at 20.8 oz; just 3 more ounces than a pair of fancy poles selling for $180.

If you have to choose between extra shoes versus trekking poles, my vote is for poles every time.

You may have blister care supplies in your first aid kit. I had Gorilla tape and moleskin, but now resorting to cheap black duct tape around each pole for foot care and other MacGyver-type repairs on the trail. After watching Randy's recent footcare interview with a Podiatrist, you may also wish to supplement your kit with "cheap black duct tape".

If you're still looking to cut weight, consider using Iodine drops or tablets for water purification instead of a water filter.
 

BillDoe708

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Nov 17, 2020
Messages
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Location
Michigan
Leuko tape for blisters.

You need trekking poles. End of story.

I question the knife. I like outdoor edge replacement blade knifes. Quick and easy to keep on working without sharpening a dull knife.
Extra blades weight nothing.

How are you charging your phone if using for a GPS?

I always like to have at least 1 paper map.
 
Joined
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I'm having an immature chuckle at the poster name and his suggestion for only 1 pair of underwear. I haven't tried just one pair yet. I like having a 2nd pair to wash/dry for smells and/or chafing.

That's a very impressive list. I'm curious to know from others if you trust a base layer and mid-layer under a breathable rain shell to eliminate the need for a puffy vest? Dry winter weather is so much easier to dress for than the humid cold air in the deep south.

Some people like having an extra pair of camp shoes (like crocs) if they have heavy boots. I love my trail runners in Summer to 1st Rifle because they dry out fast and I only carry that one pair. Even your best Gore-tex boots will get wet from sweat or water. Getting them dried out can be such a chore that sometimes just doesn't happen.

I did not see Trekking Poles on the list. This is a major weight redistribution tool that places weight and resulting fatigue away from your ankles and knees to your arms. Ozark Trail Walmart poles can be had for $20. They are adjustable, very sturdy and plenty light-weight at 20.8 oz; just 3 more ounces than a pair of fancy poles selling for $180.

If you have to choose between extra shoes versus trekking poles, my vote is for poles every time.

You may have blister care supplies in your first aid kit. I had Gorilla tape and moleskin, but now resorting to cheap black duct tape around each pole for foot care and other MacGyver-type repairs on the trail. After watching Randy's recent footcare interview with a Podiatrist, you may also wish to supplement your kit with "cheap black duct tape".

If you're still looking to cut weight, consider using Iodine drops or tablets for water purification instead of a water filter.
My list is a work in progress, lol. I can’t decide between the unconpahgre jacket and the brooks down. I’m leaning toward the brooks. Yes, I will most definitely have tracking poles with me, and I’m looking at goal zero for power bank and maybe solar panel. And moleskin and tape in in the first aid kit. Oh, and have been looking for some cheap knock off crocs, I’ve heard they are a lot lighter than crocs. I can’t decide if a rain jacket is really important, or if I’m just packing me fears, lol.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2019
Messages
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Leuko tape for blisters.

You need trekking poles. End of story.

I question the knife. I like outdoor edge replacement blade knifes. Quick and easy to keep on working without sharpening a dull knife.
Extra blades weight nothing.

How are you charging your phone if using for a GPS?

I always like to have at least 1 paper map.
I forgot to list it, but I will also have a Gerber vital, along with my favorite deer knive. If I can get my hands on some blades, that is.
 

JAG

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Mar 2, 2020
Messages
124
I have a solar charger I barely used in the field; it is bulky works in full sun- stops when a cloud passes over. I still bring it every time.

The small backup battery is my most dependable power source. It contains up to three full charges. Solar-charge your backup during the day and charge your phone at night.

In 'airplane mode' for mapping, your phone will last a very long time; in my case three (3) days.

I always have a breathable rain jacket. I had one trip when it rained every day except one with 0 rain in the forecast.

Moleskin was always in my pack and is a tried and true product. The reason the foot doctor in Randy's youtube video opts for the cheap black tape over moleskin is the tape is smoother and much less friction. The 'cheap' characteristic is that the tape is thinner and stretchy so it doesn't wrinkle when folding it over your heel or other foot curves.
 

TimeOnTarget

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Feb 13, 2015
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1,245
Location
SD
I'd be looking for a lighter tent and bag. 1 Meal a day suffices.

Some of the clothing is redundant for sure.

Where's your rain pants?
 

300_WSM

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Sep 21, 2021
Messages
23
Need a lighter sleeping bag for sure. And go sawyer filter to save 10+oz over that one.
 

SilverDollars

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Sep 4, 2013
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152
Location
Central Texas
Howdy. Drop the coffee press and go with instant coffees. Save the press for home. Pick up some trekking poles as suggested. On my initial try of them years ago, I realized they were the best investment I had purchased in a while!
 

renagde

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Nov 8, 2021
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Here's my gear list in case you're interested in comparing. This is what I use for early season archery. I probably wouldn't change much to switch to late season rifle other than switching weapons and adding a Sitka Jetstream Jacket and puffy pants.
 
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