Garmin Xero A1

IAhawks84

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Joined
Feb 17, 2019
Messages
92
Hey everyone,
Hope everyone is having a good winter. Getting ready to get cold here in Iowa.

So I was wondering if anyone has used the Garmin Xero A1? If so, what are your thoughts?

Myself and my Dad will be going on a elk hunt in September. We've both got range finders, but like with deer hunting here, you don't always have the time to range.

I usually range everything from my stand as soon as I get there, but that's not necessarily possible elk hunting. I'm curious how "tech savvy" this is as well.

Thanks and have a great night!
 

elkhnter

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Aug 7, 2009
Messages
914
Location
On the road again.
Hope you’re not going to Idaho, I believe that sight is not allowed.
Also, don’t shoot a Pope & Young animal as it won’t be accepted.
The couple guys I know that have them, like them. I’d worry about batteries and dirt.
 

Rzrbk

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
392
I recently became interested in this topic. I'm still sorting out whether I believe this technology should be allowed, much less whether I should personally use it.

This year I practiced hard with archery out to 60 and felt absolutely 100% capable at that distance for a kill shot. Long story short, elk came in and wouldn't hold still long enough to go between range finder and flinging an arrow. I missed twice before I decided I was going to wound the animal unless I changed strategy. The elk continued to walk around and bark at me, plus I found both arrows so no doubt my shots were clean misses. If I had had a buddy beside me to range the target then all would have been ok. If I would have had a buddy to call from behind me, then the elk likely would have come within 30 yards and not been focused on my location. I could have helped myself by setting up on the ridgetop where the elk would have had to come to the top to get a view. Anyway, with the elk staring at my location it would take 30 seconds or so to go from ranging to shooting and the elk would move. An elk can go a long way in a few steps angling one direction or another. It was eye opening. I plan stuff down to extreme details but never really imagined this issue till it happened...., thus my thoughts turning to GPS sights.

So, part of me says that GPS sights are a good thing to keep wounded animals to a minimum.

Another part of me says that I simply shouldn't have pulled the trigger when I wasn't certain. The answer isn't more technology, but to strictly keep within your limitations. If the elk moves before you can switch from ranging to shooting, then just don't shoot, that's part of the game. However, I doubt your average hunter will go this route when they pay thousands for the elk/deer/antelope tag. Most folks will pull the trigger and hope they get it.

Tree stand hunting back east this is hardly an issue since you can usually range known distances in advance. I've taken lots of deer with archery and never considered GPS sights before this experience and hunting out West. I can imagine solo archery antelope would have the same issues.

Is it cheating or is it a good thing? Thanks for listening to my rambling on the subject. The jury is still out on whether I'll have one of these attached to my bow next year. It seems they are legal in states I hunt.

I've spent lots of time trying to estimate distance in open fields. Maybe I suck, but I can't do it with any consistency. At 40 yards and less I get much more accurate. However, a slight rise or dip totally changes the perspective. Also, what if you buy a 1k electronic sight and it becomes illegal for hunting everywhere?
 

1bigdawg

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Joined
Oct 2, 2021
Messages
17
Location
Arizona
Next will be laser guided arrows. At some point technology gives archers an unfair advantage. Might was well shoot a powder burner.
 

kwa_bena

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Joined
Sep 20, 2021
Messages
27
Hope you’re not going to Idaho, I believe that sight is not allowed.
Also, don’t shoot a Pope & Young animal as it won’t be accepted.
The couple guys I know that have them, like them. I’d worry about batteries and dirt.
I think that only applies to rifle scopes when I went to look into it. Unless something has changed in the mean time. I do not see the reason as to not allow it. Plus it serves as a tracking assitant giving you a location of where the ranged shot may have landed.
 

elkhnter

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Aug 7, 2009
Messages
914
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On the road again.
Pope & Young is pretty clear.
“By the use of electronic devices for attracting, locating or pursuing game or guiding the hunter to such game, or by the use of a bow or arrow to which any electronic device is attached with the exception of lighted nocks and recording devices that cast no light towards the target”
 

elkhnter

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2009
Messages
914
Location
On the road again.
Idaho looks pretty clear also.
“With any electronic or tritium-powered device attached to an arrow, bolt, or bow, except hunters with a physical or visual disability may apply for a Reasonable Modification Permit
to use a crossbow or a device that holds a bow at partial or full draw and/or use a scope or sight magnification(including battery-powered or tritium-lighted reticles) that may include magnification up to 4x power”.

Guessing you should read the rules a little better.
 

jpcoll01

New member
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
17
Looks like Montana is a no-go with this sight as well, I was really considering getting one. I wonder if states will come around because this is new? I am just getting in to archery. Next fall will be my first archery hunt in Montana (assuming I draw a general combo tag).
 

buck137

Member
Joined
May 11, 2019
Messages
62
Location
Western Montana
Looks like Montana is a no-go with this sight as well, I was really considering getting one. I wonder if states will come around because this is new? I am just getting in to archery. Next fall will be my first archery hunt in Montana (assuming I draw a general combo tag).
We were just allowed lighted nocks two years ago, I wouldn't hold your breath hoping this sight will be allowed any time soon.
 

jpcoll01

New member
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
17
Not allowed in Montana. Practice your range finding skills.
I have the Vortex fury bino's with rangefinder. Although they are handy as heck normally I can see where they would be a hindrance when archery hunting. Next year will be my first year archery hunting so will just have to practice using them and quickly getting back in my harness.
 

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