Fired up the smoker when I got home

D_Walt

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Smoked a backstrap and a ham roast for dinner, it was outstanding. Kids made quick work of it! Since my wife wasn’t home when I started cooking, our “vegetables” consisted of two kinds of potatoes, jalapeños and refried beans.
 

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eshunt

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Looks delicious! I’ve been smoking/slow cooking ham roasts this winter and they are so good. I was tentative on the smoker, but glad I got one. They come out so moist and tender.
 

D_Walt

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Apr 15, 2020
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I baste mine with either an olive oil/basalmic mixture or a butter based mix to keep the outside from drying out. You can sure screw up a piece of venison on the smoker if you’re not careful. But done right it’s outstanding.
 

wyoboypt

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Smoked a backstrap and a ham roast for dinner, it was outstanding. Kids made quick work of it! Since my wife wasn’t home when I started cooking, our “vegetables” consisted of two kinds of potatoes, jalapeños and refried beans.
How do you smoke a wild game backstrap without drying it out?? I’ve only been able to have good ones cooking on high heat.
 

D_Walt

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How do you smoke a wild game backstrap without drying it out?? I’ve only been able to have good ones cooking on high heat.
“Smoked” is kind of a loose term in this instance. I have a big offset fire box smoker (indirect heat) that for cooking back straps (or large roasts from the hams) I take up to about 275-300 for 1 - 1.5 hours. I usually use a mix of oak and mesquite. Gets that nice smoke ring you see in the pic and leaves it medium/medium rare. I make a baste of a melted stick of butter, a little brown sugar and a little basalmic vinegar. Soy or worschesire works also instead of the basalmic. As always with venison, the key is to not overcook it - i.e. you can’t smoke venison until it’s tender like you would a brisket.
 

wyoboypt

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Oct 4, 2017
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753
Location
Wyoming
“Smoked” is kind of a loose term in this instance. I have a big offset fire box smoker (indirect heat) that for cooking back straps (or large roasts from the hams) I take up to about 275-300 for 1 - 1.5 hours. I usually use a mix of oak and mesquite. Gets that nice smoke ring you see in the pic and leaves it medium/medium rare. I make a baste of a melted stick of butter, a little brown sugar and a little basalmic vinegar. Soy or worschesire works also instead of the basalmic. As always with venison, the key is to not overcook it - i.e. you can’t smoke venison until it’s tender like you would a brisket.
What internal temp do you end up with?? If it’s not a secret😁
 

D_Walt

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Apr 15, 2020
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What internal temp do you end up with?? If it’s not a secret😁
I don’t know for sure, I haven’t measured the internal temp when I cook them like this in a long time. I would guess it’s in the upper 130’s. Wife and kids requested another one next weekend so I may check the temp on that one.
Side note: take the left overs, slice very thin. Sauté some onion & bell peppers and mushrooms in butter in skillet, throw in thin sliced meat to heat it up. Layer meat, peppers, onions with cheese on a toasted bun.
 
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