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Changes that can’t be measured

BuzzH

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Joined
Jan 9, 2001
Messages
14,698
Location
Laramie, WY
You mean somewhere that your money is worth more and you're effectively the non resident billionaire and people suck up to you?

🤣🤣 Just busting your chops.
Somewhere in a country that appreciates and values your money, values themselves, and the products they sell. You know, the way the US was about 50 years ago.

The American dream is still alive and well, just not in the United States anymore.

The American dollar in the US has no value anymore, the service and products reflect that. If you don't pay working class stiffs enough to afford quality products, you sell them a bunch of "chit" they can afford.

The companies that are providing that "chit" product, farm manufacturing jobs over-seas where THEIR dollar buys them more and cheaper labor to provide that chit product to underpaid Americans so they can maximize their profits.

Too bad average American retiree's aren't more willing to take their retirement income to some of those same places our manufacturing was farmed out to, so they maximize their income and quality of life.

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em....who do they think I learned it from?
 
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BuzzH

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2001
Messages
14,698
Location
Laramie, WY
The non-resident high point holders that got screwed by the 90/10 rule change and are moving to wyoming?
Whatever blows your hair back, it's a free country...sort of.

Wyoming's population growth is glacial...that won't change over a few thousand sheep and moose point holders.

It's your fantasy though, make it as big as you want.
 
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mtmuley

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2009
Messages
11,215
Location
montana
Somewhere in a country that appreciates and values your money, values themselves, and the products they sell. You know, the way the US was about 50 years ago.

The American dream is still alive and well, just not in the United States anymore.

The American dollar in the US has no value anymore, the service and products reflect that. If you don't pay working class stiffs enough to afford quality products, you sell them a bunch of "chit" they can afford.

The companies that are providing that "chit" product, farm manufacturing jobs over-seas where THEIR dollar buys them more and cheaper labor to provide that chit product to underpaid Americans so they can maximize their profits.

Too bad average American retiree's aren't more willing to take their retirement income to some of those same places our manufacturing was farmed out to, so they maximize their income and quality of life.

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em....who do they think I learned it from?
Happy 4th Buzz. mtmuley
 

OntarioHunter

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Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
4,588
This brings to mind an incident in 1987 when I was a US park ranger in New Orleans. My unit was on the edge of the metropolis. One day myself and coworker were required to be at the head office downtown on Canal Street. We had to drive through one of the roughest parts of town. Ron and I were white guys in uniforms. This part of town was NOT white. While at a stoplight steam suddenly boiled up from under the hood. Also at the intersection was a billiard hall/bar with a bunch of toughs hanging out in front. I pull out of the intersection and get out to see what's the problem. The guys are watching me, converse for a few seconds, then a group starts heading our direction. Ron screams at me to get in the truck. Pffft. Why? What would that accomplish? As they walk up Ron leans over and locks my door. "Whatsa problem, man." "Looks like I blew a radiator hose." "Yep. Looks that way." "Is there a phone in that bar so I can call for a tow truck?" They looked at each other and smiled. "Might be tough gettin one around here." "Hey, John, call your brother. He can fix anything." So we stand around and chat for a while. They're interested in the Montana guy working in New Orleans who just got married in Peterborough, Ontario the week before. John shows up with a toolbox, a couple of hose clamps, and some pipe. These guys wouldn't let me touch the truck. "You ain't gettin that purty uniform dirty." The hose was spliced and radiator restocked with fluid. Maybe took forty minutes altogether. Meantime Ron never unlocked the doors. He was whiter than usual. "What's up with him?" I just smiled, winked, and shrugged my shoulders. They laughed. I offered up $20 (a bit of money back then) but they wouldn't take a dime. "You'd do it for any of us." "Yes I would, but I don't know about Ron in the truck." Their turn to smile and shrug.
 

NoWiser

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Joined
Feb 12, 2013
Messages
2,054
Location
Minnesota
It can happen anywhere. Years ago I was fishing Red Lake in northern MN. Driving back to the resort I saw a truck with the hood up. It was cold and his battery was dead. I gave him a jump and we were on our way. Two days later it was really cold. Around -30 temp. I went to wrap things up and my battery was dead. I happened to look up and saw the exact same guy I jump-started. I flagged him down and asked him for a jump start. He simply said “no time” and took off. The next closest fisherman was probably 1/2 mile away so I walked over to his house and asked for help and was promptly refused. This was before the days of cell phones. There was nobody else in sight so I walked back to my house. Carried the truck battery inside to warm up and barely got the truck going.
 

Treeshark

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Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
753
Location
Wisconsin
That one really sucks, NoWiser. Being stuck on a lake in those temps isn’t just an inconvenience, it’s could be life threatening. You have to drop what you’re doing and help someone.

On Winnebago in the winter, it seems there is an unwritten rule that you don’t leave someone stranded. I’ve been on both sides of it and have never ignored it myself and have never seen it ignored by anyone else. If I can’t help them, I will wait with them until someone shows up who can.

Just this past winter I got buried on a shove/drift right at dark about 3 miles off shore, thought I could make it but broke through and was stuck beyond stuck. It took two full sized trucks about 20 minutes of pulling to get me out, but those guys weren’t going anywhere until I was.

I tried to give them each $20, no way they would take it. Slipped it to one of their kids and told him to give it to them on the drive home.

People are generally nice here- I cannot ever remember someone turning their back on me or anyone I know who really needed help. But the world is changing, I’m sure I will be disappointed eventually.
 
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Brittany Chukarman

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Joined
Dec 16, 2003
Messages
1,966
Location
Richland,Or
I just think it's how people are raised. Doing the right thing is something you're taught from childhood. Piss-poor parenting.
This story should be in a national newspaper, at least a letter to the editor in the local.
 

MTGomer

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Joined
Sep 25, 2015
Messages
4,947
Location
MT —> AZ
I just think it's how people are raised. Doing the right thing is something you're taught from childhood. Piss-poor parenting.
This story should be in a national newspaper, at least a letter to the editor in the local.


My father was far from punitive or overly strict, but I cannot imagine what he would have said or done when I was in high school, if he found out that someone asked for my help, then offered to pay me for 30 seconds of my time and I said “nah bro we good”.
 

Leinenkugelsfreak

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Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
7,794
Location
Northern Illinois
My father was far from punitive or overly strict, but I cannot imagine what he would have said or done when I was in high school, if he found out that someone asked for my help, then offered to pay me for 30 seconds of my time and I said “nah bro we good”.
I can't imagine what mine would of done if I used the phrase "nah bro" or "we good" regardless the context.
 

TwistedSage

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Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
678
Location
Eastern NM
About 13 years ago fesh out of trade school at 19 I had an interview at the Coca-Cola distribution hub in the kensington neighborhood in Philadelphia. If you don't know about kensington it is one of the rougher neighborhoods in the city. My dumb ass left the ceiling light on in my blazer and when I came back out a couple hrs later my battery was dead. Being the unprepared younger self I was didn't have any jumper cables. Luckily there was a police station pretty much across the street. After waiving down the first cop thay passed I asked him if he could give me a jump. He kind of sucked through his teeth and said ya know this isn't my car I don't want to get in trouble for messing the battery up. There's our station right across the street ask the officer at the counter if he can help. Walked into the building went to the counter and explained I was right across the street with a dead battery cam I got a jump or borrow cables? Dude looked both ways and just said nope we don't have any cables here. Another person drove by and told me to walk to the muffler shop a few blocks away. I walked into the hood a mile or so until I got to the shop, the guy at the discount muffler shop shook his head when I told him what happen gave me a ride to my truck and a jump.

There's always been shitty people, now that there's more people in general there's more shitty people. Has the ratio changed? Maybe people are more on guard now but id like to think there is also just as much good being out out there.
 

JEL

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2013
Messages
1,426
Location
Helena, MT
I try and believe most people are good but not so sure. I think fear does keep some from helping. My sons pickup had a dead battery in the Great Falls airport long term lot after a trip last winter. He has jump cables and asked several folks for an assist. After the forth turn down he called a towing company. I was bummed to hear that.
 

okie archer

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2015
Messages
536
It can happen anywhere. Years ago I was fishing Red Lake in northern MN. Driving back to the resort I saw a truck with the hood up. It was cold and his battery was dead. I gave him a jump and we were on our way. Two days later it was really cold. Around -30 temp. I went to wrap things up and my battery was dead. I happened to look up and saw the exact same guy I jump-started. I flagged him down and asked him for a jump start. He simply said “no time” and took off. The next closest fisherman was probably 1/2 mile away so I walked over to his house and asked for help and was promptly refused. This was before the days of cell phones. There was nobody else in sight so I walked back to my house. Carried the truck battery inside to warm up and barely got the truck going.
Man this one is crazy. Can't imagine the audacity in turning you down like that after you just helped him two days before. The lack of human decency is mind blowing. I can't imagine not feeling guilty with myself for treating someone like that.
 

MTGomer

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Joined
Sep 25, 2015
Messages
4,947
Location
MT —> AZ
It can happen anywhere. Years ago I was fishing Red Lake in northern MN. Driving back to the resort I saw a truck with the hood up. It was cold and his battery was dead. I gave him a jump and we were on our way. Two days later it was really cold. Around -30 temp. I went to wrap things up and my battery was dead. I happened to look up and saw the exact same guy I jump-started. I flagged him down and asked him for a jump start. He simply said “no time” and took off. The next closest fisherman was probably 1/2 mile away so I walked over to his house and asked for help and was promptly refused. This was before the days of cell phones. There was nobody else in sight so I walked back to my house. Carried the truck battery inside to warm up and barely got the truck going.

This one is way worse than my story.
 

runningmt

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Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
716
There’s been pricks ever since we stopped swinging in trees

There’s been genuinely nice folks since we stopped swinging in trees

It’s an unfortunate luck of the draw, although I will say, some of the biggest jerks I’ve met in my 20 years in the greater Bozeman area have been Montana born.

The generosity of local “Montanans” (most of which are transplants) that we witnessed after the recent floods of the Yellowstone River here in Livingston is a great representation of how good people still are. There are certainly jerks too, always will be, always have been.
 
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