Ollin Magnetic Digiscoping System

Best and worst hunting/outdoor writers

neffa3

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Apr 17, 2015
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9,583
Location
Wenatchee
Something additional, is that certain people have produced one thing that mystifies and captures, and then kind of went a different direction. Years back Rinella spoke about this short story, "The Ledge", by Lawrence Sargent Hall. It's a father-son duck hunting story, and smacks your heart upside the ventricle like maybe nothing else I've read. So if only producing one work of "outdoor writing" counts, I'd count this guy.

https://ds062.k12.sd.us/kingsahlimon/pdf/CW/The Ledge, Hall short story.pdf
Ug. That's terribly good?
 

reallyoldman

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Oct 6, 2021
Messages
93
Do any of you remember Jim Bond ? He was like Gordon Eastman in that he took some incredible movies and went around showing them in high school auditoriums. He wrote several books and darn it I got rid of all that stuff before I realized their value to me. He had a couple of Alaska videos/mpvies that were outstanding. He had one called Bucks, Bucks, Bucks that would be priceless today and give glimpse of the good old days of mule deer.
 

wllm

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Dec 9, 2015
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16,526
Location
Boston
Really? I pictured you more of a J.K. Rowling person...

As Doris Kearns Goodwin once wrote;

"There are two novels that can change a bro's life: Harry Potter and Keep Hammering. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves wizards."*

* Entirely misquoted and attributed.
 

tkhuntsman

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Nov 15, 2022
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51
Location
Helena, MT
I'm a huge fan of Jim Corbett and Kenneth Anderson. I really can't think of many outdoor writers that I don't at least like some of what they wrote. Roosevelt's stuff was kinda dry but still enjoyable. Ruark and Hemingway are a little long winded and travel down the rabbit holes often but I still like em. I even like Spomer and Keyser though they can get a little to techy on some subjects.
 

Hunter4Life78

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Sep 4, 2022
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641
I don't read like I used too and cannot remember authors. The lists here have been amazing and I see I have authors to look into.

With that said, my introduction to outdoor writing was Pat McManus, specifically The Grasshopper Trap.
I really enjoyed the book, The Only Good Bear Is A Dead Bear. It's a collection of stories and news articles and storiesbduring the civilization of the West and Post West civilization , really showed how the Bear was viewed and detailed attacks.
Roland Cheek is another author I like to read.
A local outfitter,Bud Cheff Sr., from my neck of the woods authored "Indian Trails and Grizzly Tales" documenting his growing up in the Mission Valley. He also wrote, "A Woodsman and his Hatchet".
 

NDcoyote

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Aug 10, 2016
Messages
55
I need to make it a point to read more of the works from the classic outdoor writters. This thread makes it apparent that Im missing out on alot!
I sure do miss Dwight Schuh for the how-to/informational type bowhunting articles and he was a great story teller as well. His articles were always the first I would looks at when a new issue of Bowhunter Magazine came in the mail. He seemed like and individual that was truly worth looking up to in the hunting community. I also really enjoyed Elemer Keith's Hell I Was There, and Peter Capsticks Death In The Long Grass.
 

Brad

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Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Messages
176
Location
Montana
As Doris Kearns Goodwin once wrote;

"There are two novels that can change a bro's life: Harry Potter and Keep Hammering. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves wizards."*

* Entirely misquoted and attributed.
"Keep Hammering"... never heard of it. Care to enlighten? Thanks.
 

Brad

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Jan 13, 2001
Messages
176
Location
Montana
So many that I enjoy, I think most all have been listed on this thread.

Worst by a country mile: Clay Harvey.

Never much cared for Jon Sundra.
 

Dan O

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Oct 28, 2014
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1,109
Location
Seeley Lake, Mt
Another I have not seen listed here is M. R. James. He started Bowhunter magazine and was editor for many years. He has penned many articles and continues today. He is in his 80's and has a facebook page that he writes on everyday regarding his bowhunting and photgraphy on his farm.
 

CorkyM

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Joined
Dec 4, 2022
Messages
264
Location
Franklin County Pennsylvania
George Mattis wrote a wonderful book in 1969 entitled
“WHITETAIL, Fundamentals and Fine Points for the Hunter.” It is still on my bookshelf. I have also enjoyed articles by Jim Zumbo and books by Jack O’Connor.
 

BrooksRanger

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Jun 10, 2019
Messages
58
Location
Southeast, Alaska
I'm surprised no-one has mentioned the late Canadian author of so many inspiring outdoor adventures stories for young people, Farley Mowat.
Another favorite, is John Haines, an Alaskan poet and writer who homesteaded after WWII. If you really want to be inspired by the North country, pick up "Living Off the Country," this winter.
 

WoodMoose

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Joined
Jan 8, 2001
Messages
348
Location
N.C.
Larry Koller wrote "Shots at Whitetails" - probably read it 400 times as a kid (ok, slight exaggeration)

mostly a northern/northeastern whitetail hunting book, but I loved it - still have my copy

lots of good ones - more not so good
 
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